reading-comprehension

Reading Comprehension

Reading Comprehension: English Reading Comprehension Exercises with Answers, Sample Passages for Reading Comprehension Test for GRE, CAT, IELTS preparation

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English Reading Comprehension Test Questions and Answers. Improve your ability to read and comprehend English Passages

Q1. > Sting operations are a decade-and-a-half old in India. In 2000, sting > pioneer Tehelka did one on cricketers to throw light on how matches > were fixed. In 2001, their ‘Operation West End’ was on middlemen in > defence deals and bribes taken by political leaders. And in 2007, > ‘Operation Duryodhan’ caught 11 MPs taking bribes to put dictated > questions in Parliament. Many more followed. It is said that the > expression ‘sting operation’ seemed to have emerged from the name of a > popular 1973 American movie ‘The Sting’, which was based on a > complicated plot hatched by two persons to trick a third person into > committing a crime. A sting operation raises certain moral and ethical > questions. The victim, who is otherwise innocent, is lured into > committing a crime on the assurance of absolute secrecy and > confidentiality of the circumstances, raising the potential question > as to how such a victim can be held responsible for the crime which he > would not have committed but for the enticement. > > > Though sting operations have been around, it was Aam Aadmi Party and > its chief Arvind Kejriwal who sharpened it as a weapon in the mobile > phone-wielding hands of the public to catch the corrupt. AAP and > Kejriwal relentlessly exhorted people to sting officials who demanded > illegal gratification. The stings streamed in, catching both the big > and the small. The latest one doing the rounds is the one on Kejriwal > himself. A private conversation secretly recorded has become the hot > topic of public debate. Which of the following is TRUE in the context of the passage?

  1.  Despite pronouncements, conflict between sting operations and privacy will continue to remain a contentious point in future.
  2.  Sanctity attached to personal privacy of a person was expanded by the SC in two subsequent judgements.
  3.  Indeed, nothing is more deleterious to a man's physical happiness.
  4.  All of the above
  5.  None of these

Solution : None of these
Q2. > Sting operations are a decade-and-a-half old in India. In 2000, sting > pioneer Tehelka did one on cricketers to throw light on how matches > were fixed. In 2001, their ‘Operation West End’ was on middlemen in > defence deals and bribes taken by political leaders. And in 2007, > ‘Operation Duryodhan’ caught 11 MPs taking bribes to put dictated > questions in Parliament. Many more followed. It is said that the > expression ‘sting operation’ seemed to have emerged from the name of a > popular 1973 American movie ‘The Sting’, which was based on a > complicated plot hatched by two persons to trick a third person into > committing a crime. A sting operation raises certain moral and ethical > questions. The victim, who is otherwise innocent, is lured into > committing a crime on the assurance of absolute secrecy and > confidentiality of the circumstances, raising the potential question > as to how such a victim can be held responsible for the crime which he > would not have committed but for the enticement. > > > Though sting operations have been around, it was Aam Aadmi Party and > its chief Arvind Kejriwal who sharpened it as a weapon in the mobile > phone-wielding hands of the public to catch the corrupt. AAP and > Kejriwal relentlessly exhorted people to sting officials who demanded > illegal gratification. The stings streamed in, catching both the big > and the small. The latest one doing the rounds is the one on Kejriwal > himself. A private conversation secretly recorded has become the hot > topic of public debate. Which of the following is an advantage of sting operation? 1) It can check the crimes up to great extent. 2) It is an effective tool to reduce corruption. 3) Media can easily violate a person's right to privacy.

  1.  Both 1 and 2
  2.  Only 2
  3.  Only 3
  4.  None of these

Solution : Both 1 and 2

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Q3. > Every year, the sun irradiates the land masses on earth with the > equivalent of 19,000 billion tonnes of oil equivalent (toe). Only a > fraction — 9 billion toe — would satisfy the world’s current energy > requirements. Put differently, in 20 minutes, the amount of solar > energy falling on the earth could power the planet for one year. Every > hour the sun beams onto Earth more than enough energy to satisfy > global energy needs for an entire year. Solar energy is the technology > used to harness the sun’s energy and make it useable. Today, the > technology produces less than one tenth of one per cent of global > energy demand. All energy originates with the sun except for nuclear, > geothermal and tidal energy. Solar energy comes to us as high > intensity radiation (light energy). As it falls on the earth, it is > transformed into heat by any surface or material — be it the > atmosphere, soil, buildings, or even the furniture in front of a > window. This heat also drives the world’s weather systems including > wind, rain and river flow. > > Through photosynthesis, plants also turn solar energy into new growth. > Many people are familiar with so-called photovoltaic cells, or solar > panels, found on things like spacecraft, rooftops, and handheld > calculators. The cells are made of semiconductor materials like those > found in computer chips. When sunlight hits the cells, it knocks > electrons loose from their atoms. As the electrons flow through the > cell, they generate electricity. Photo-voltaic were initially, and > still are, used to power small and medium-sized applications, from the > calculator powered by a single solar cell to off-grid homes powered by > a photovoltaic array. They are an important and relatively inexpensive > source of electrical energy where grid power is inconvenient, > unreasonably expensive to connect, or simply unavailable. However, as > the cost of solar electricity is falling, solar power is also > increasingly being used even in grid-connected situations as a way to > feed low-carbon energy into the grid. On a much larger scale, solar > thermal power plants employ various techniques to concentrate the > sun’s energy as a heat source. The heat is then used to boil water to > drive a steam turbine that generates electricity in much the same > fashion as coal and nuclear power plants, supplying electricity for > thousands of people. In one technique, long troughs of Ushaped mirrors > focus sunlight on a pipe of oil that runs through the middle. The hot > oil then boils water for electricity generation. Another technique > uses movable mirrors to focus the sun’s rays on a collector tower, > where a receiver sits. > > Molten salt flowing through the receiver is heated to run a generator. > Other solar technologies are passive. For example, big windows placed > on the sunny side of a building allow sunlight to heat-absorbent > materials on the floor and walls. These surfaces then release the heat > at night to keep the building warm. Similarly, absorbent plates on a > roof can heat liquid in tubes that supply a house with hot water. > Solar energy is lauded as an inexhaustible fuel source that is > pollution and often noise free. The technology is also versatile. For > example, solar cells generate energy for far-out places like > satellites in Earth orbit and cabins deep in the Rocky Mountains as > easily as they can power downtown buildings and futuristic cars. But > solar energy doesn’t work at night without a storage device such as a > battery, and cloudy weather can make the technology unreliable during > the day. Solar technologies are also very expensive and require a lot > of land area to collect the sun’s energy at rates useful to lots of > people. Despite the drawbacks, solar energy use has surged at about 20 > per cent a year over the past 15 years, thanks to rapidly falling > prices and gains in efficiency. Japan, Germany, and the United States > are major markets for solar cells. With tax incentives, solar > electricity can often pay for itself in five to ten years. Which of the following is FALSE in the context of the given passage ?

  1.  It brings you an array of solutions from standalone rooftop solar panels for homes and small businesses.
  2.  Solar energy is the endless energy which is received from the sun
  3.  Solar system a cost-effective
  4.  All of the above
  5.  None of the above

Solution : None of the above
Q4. > The Constitution of India (Article 19) gives the right to all citizens > to “to move freely throughout the territory of India; to reside and > settle in any part of the territory of India” which leads to two main > types of migration: first, internal migration, i.e. migration within > one country, and second international migration, which means the > movement from one country to another. The reasons for migration can be > divided into two main aspects, the so-called “push” and “pull” > factors. Push factors are those in their old place which force people > to move. Pull factors are factors in the target country which > encourage people to move; these include peace and safety, a chance of > a better job, better education, social security, a better standard of > living in general as well as political and religious freedom. Since > the 1830s, international migration from India under British rule > comprised largely of unskilled workers from poorer socio-economic > groups who went to other colonised countries. > > > Between 1834 and 1937, nearly 30 million people left India and nearly > four-fifths returned. Post-Independence, migrants came from richer > socio-economic groups, from wealthier parts of the country and, with > the exception of the large migration to the Middle East, went > industrialised. The migrant stream to the United States in particular > has been the most highly educated, both compared to other immigrants > into the US, as well as to other Indian migrant streams abroad. Since > the 1990s, increasing numbers of skilled emigrants from India have > also been moving to Australia, Canada, New Zealand and Singapore. > > Migration of persons within national borders is far greater in > magnitude than migration across international borders and has enormous > potential to contribute to economic prosperity, social cohesion and > urban diversity. Internal migration is an essential and inevitable > component of the economic and social life of the country, given > regional imbalances and labour shortages, and safe migration should be > promoted to maximise its benefits. However, in the absence of a > coherent policy framework and strategy, migration imposes heavy costs > on human development through poor labour arrangements and working > conditions of migrants, and obstacles in their access to shelter, > education, healthcare and food. > > Migrants constitute a ‘floating’ and invisible population, alternating > between source and destination areas and remaining on the periphery of > society. In India, internal migration has been accorded very low > priority by the government, and policies of the Indian state have > largely failed in providing any form of legal or social protection to > this vulnerable group. What's the main difference between push and pull factors of migration ?

  1.  Push factors are conditions that drives people to leave their homes, while pull factors attracts people to a new area.
  2.  Push or pull factors that made your family happy.
  3.  Push means a new home in a different state, while pull means influence people to shift in new home.
  4.  Push and pull factors are closely interrelated.
  5.  None of these

Solution : Push factors are conditions that drives people to leave their homes, while pull factors attracts people to a new area.

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Q5. > The Constitution of India (Article 19) gives the right to all citizens > to “to move freely throughout the territory of India; to reside and > settle in any part of the territory of India” which leads to two main > types of migration: first, internal migration, i.e. migration within > one country, and second international migration, which means the > movement from one country to another. The reasons for migration can be > divided into two main aspects, the so-called “push” and “pull” > factors. Push factors are those in their old place which force people > to move. Pull factors are factors in the target country which > encourage people to move; these include peace and safety, a chance of > a better job, better education, social security, a better standard of > living in general as well as political and religious freedom. Since > the 1830s, international migration from India under British rule > comprised largely of unskilled workers from poorer socio-economic > groups who went to other colonised countries. > > > Between 1834 and 1937, nearly 30 million people left India and nearly > four-fifths returned. Post-Independence, migrants came from richer > socio-economic groups, from wealthier parts of the country and, with > the exception of the large migration to the Middle East, went > industrialised. The migrant stream to the United States in particular > has been the most highly educated, both compared to other immigrants > into the US, as well as to other Indian migrant streams abroad. Since > the 1990s, increasing numbers of skilled emigrants from India have > also been moving to Australia, Canada, New Zealand and Singapore. > > Migration of persons within national borders is far greater in > magnitude than migration across international borders and has enormous > potential to contribute to economic prosperity, social cohesion and > urban diversity. Internal migration is an essential and inevitable > component of the economic and social life of the country, given > regional imbalances and labour shortages, and safe migration should be > promoted to maximise its benefits. However, in the absence of a > coherent policy framework and strategy, migration imposes heavy costs > on human development through poor labour arrangements and working > conditions of migrants, and obstacles in their access to shelter, > education, healthcare and food. > > Migrants constitute a ‘floating’ and invisible population, alternating > between source and destination areas and remaining on the periphery of > society. In India, internal migration has been accorded very low > priority by the government, and policies of the Indian state have > largely failed in providing any form of legal or social protection to > this vulnerable group. Most of the highly educated group of India has been migrated in which of the following country as given in the passage?

  1.  China and USA
  2.  Australia and Singapore
  3.  Canada and New Zealand
  4.  Both 2 and 3
  5.  None of these

Solution : Both 2 and 3
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