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Reading Comprehension

Reading Comprehension: English Reading Comprehension Exercises with Answers, Sample Passages for Reading Comprehension Test for GRE, CAT, IELTS preparation

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English Reading Comprehension Test Questions and Answers. Improve your ability to read and comprehend English Passages

Q156. > The 2015 Review of the Non Proliferation Treaty (NPT) will take > place in New York from April 27 to May 22 and the process is > expected to be stormy and contentious. The event marks some > significant anniversaries of conflict: the 100th — of the use of > chemical weapons in Ypres, Belgium; the 70th — of the bombings of > Hiroshima and Nagasaki; and the 20th — of the indefinite extension of > the NPT. A new set of geopolitical drivers will work the agendas of > nuclear and non-nuclear members of the Treaty. Coming into force in > 1970, the Treaty has been subjected to numerous pulls and pressures > which have left the dream of nuclear disarmament unattained and the > purpose of preventing proliferation defeated. The last review, in > 2010, followed the complete failure of the 2005 Review conference, as > a consequence of serious disagreements which had emerged over a > decade. The desire of non-nuclear states to see better progress on > disarmament by the Nuclear Weapons States (NWS) will figure as before. > The discourse on the humanitarian impact of nuclear weapons has given > a new shape to the NPT debate. The NWS have not been enthused by > either of these two concepts. Relations among the NWS after Russian > actions in Ukraine will have a substantial impact on the conference. > Moscow’s rhetoric and responses have led to a rethink on the role and > relevance of nuclear deterrence, even among the non-nuclear states of > eastern Europe. As if this is not enough, the situation in West Asia > will loom large since it involves the uncertainties of Iran, Israel, > Syria and the Islamic State (IS) in particular and the rest of the > Arab world in general. In comparison, the nuclear shenanigans of North > Korea which were once viewed as a major global danger, would remain a > marginal issue. The NPT Review Conference in 2010 built a > hard-fought consensus based on more than 60 action points spread over > three broad areas. These three “pillars” were nuclear disarmament, > non-proliferation and peaceful uses of nuclear energy. West Asia > figured large, which primarily meant finding a way to a nuclear-free > zone, which in turn meant addressing the issue of Israel’s nuclear > weapons. This has now been much muddied by Iran’s own nuclear > programme which in turn could now be resolved if the Joint > Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) between the P5+1 (the United > States, the United Kingdom, Germany, France, Russia, and China, > facilitated by the European Union) and Iran comes to fruition. Three > preparatory committee (Prepcom) meetings have been held so far to > prepare an agenda or work plan for the 2015 Review Conference next > week. Reconciling the wide range of views of 190-member states has > never been easy. Consequently, various consensus drafts have been > attempted and what emerges as the agreed agenda for the conference > remains to be seen. The three pillars are in themselves complex and > intractable as examined hereon. Nuclear disarmament is possibly the > easiest issue on the table, more so because there is no solution > possible or even conceivable. As a result, a formulaic approach is > likely to get used in which non-nuclear weapon states deplore the > NWS’s lack of progress on reducing their arsenals and making good on > promises made in the past. On their part, the NWS will reaffirm their > commitment to disarmament, but point to the strategic security > scenario to justify the incremental and slow progress so far. This > will be contested strongly at the conference. The discourse on the > humanitarian dangers, from the use, deliberate or accidental, of > nuclear weapons either by states or non-state actors, has gathered > strength. This requires, from the NWS, greater transparency and > tangible steps on nuclear security. U.S. President Barack Obama has > led the initiative on nuclear security through international > conferences, which have yielded more statements of intentions than > specific actions. This will coalesce the non-nuclear states into a > large bloc demanding tangible action from the NWS. They would seek > time bound progress on the long promised consultative process among > the NWS. Which of the following is true according to the passage?

  1.  Hillary Clinton will be one of the presidential candidate for the next Election
  2.  The non-nuclear states are demanding tangible action from the NWS.
  3.  NWS will reaffirm their commitment to disarmament, but point to the strategic security scenario.
  4.  North Korea is ready for the disarmament which is a global asset to the world.
  5.  None of these

Solution : NWS will reaffirm their commitment to disarmament, but point to the strategic security scenario.
Q157. > Women’s grassroots activism and their vision of a new civic > consciousness lay at the heart of social reform in the United States > throughout the Progressive Era, the period between the depression of > 1893 and America’s entry into the Second World War. Though largely > disenfranchised except for school elections, white middle-class women > reformers won a variety of victories, notably in the improvement of > working conditions, especially for women and children. Ironically, > though, child labor legislation pitted women of different classes > against one another. To the reformers, child labor and industrial > homework were equally inhumane practices that should be outlawed, but, > as a number of women historians have recently observed, working-class > mothers did not always share this view. Given the precarious finances > of working-class families and the necessity of pooling the wages of as > many family members as possible, working-class families viewed the > passage and enforcement of stringent child labor statutes as a > personal economic disaster and made strenuous efforts to circumvent > child labor laws. Yet reformers rarely understood this resistance in > terms of the desperate economic situation of working class families, > interpreting it instead as evidence of poor parenting. This is not to > dispute women reformers’ perception of child labor as a terribly > exploitative practice, but their understanding of child labor and > their legislative solutions for ending it failed to take account of > the economic needs of working-class families. The primary purpose of the passage is to

  1.  explain why women reformers of the Progressive Era failed to achieve their goals
  2.  discuss the origins of child labor laws in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries
  3.  compare the living conditions of working-class and middle-class women in the Progressive Era
  4.  discuss an oversight on the part of women reformers of the Progressive Era
  5.  revise a traditional view of the role played by women reformers in enacting Progressive Era Reforms

Solution : discuss an oversight on the part of women reformers of the Progressive Era

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Q158. > Women’s grassroots activism and their vision of a new civic > consciousness lay at the heart of social reform in the United States > throughout the Progressive Era, the period between the depression of > 1893 and America’s entry into the Second World War. Though largely > disenfranchised except for school elections, white middle-class women > reformers won a variety of victories, notably in the improvement of > working conditions, especially for women and children. Ironically, > though, child labor legislation pitted women of different classes > against one another. To the reformers, child labor and industrial > homework were equally inhumane practices that should be outlawed, but, > as a number of women historians have recently observed, working-class > mothers did not always share this view. Given the precarious finances > of working-class families and the necessity of pooling the wages of as > many family members as possible, working-class families viewed the > passage and enforcement of stringent child labor statutes as a > personal economic disaster and made strenuous efforts to circumvent > child labor laws. Yet reformers rarely understood this resistance in > terms of the desperate economic situation of working class families, > interpreting it instead as evidence of poor parenting. This is not to > dispute women reformers’ perception of child labor as a terribly > exploitative practice, but their understanding of child labor and > their legislative solutions for ending it failed to take account of > the economic needs of working-class families. The view mentioned in line 17 of the passage refers to which of the following?

  1.  Some working-class mothers’ resistance to the enforcement of child labor laws
  2.  Reformers’ belief that child labor and industrial homework should be abolished
  3.  Reformers’ opinions about how working-class families raised their children
  4.  Certain women historians’ observation that there was a lack of consensus between women of
  5.  Working-class families’ fears about the adverse consequences that child labor laws would have

Solution : Reformers’ belief that child labor and industrial homework should be abolished
Q159. > Women’s grassroots activism and their vision of a new civic > consciousness lay at the heart of social reform in the United States > throughout the Progressive Era, the period between the depression of > 1893 and America’s entry into the Second World War. Though largely > disenfranchised except for school elections, white middle-class women > reformers won a variety of victories, notably in the improvement of > working conditions, especially for women and children. Ironically, > though, child labor legislation pitted women of different classes > against one another. To the reformers, child labor and industrial > homework were equally inhumane practices that should be outlawed, but, > as a number of women historians have recently observed, working-class > mothers did not always share this view. Given the precarious finances > of working-class families and the necessity of pooling the wages of as > many family members as possible, working-class families viewed the > passage and enforcement of stringent child labor statutes as a > personal economic disaster and made strenuous efforts to circumvent > child labor laws. Yet reformers rarely understood this resistance in > terms of the desperate economic situation of working class families, > interpreting it instead as evidence of poor parenting. This is not to > dispute women reformers’ perception of child labor as a terribly > exploitative practice, but their understanding of child labor and > their legislative solutions for ending it failed to take account of > the economic needs of working-class families. The author of the passage mentions the observations of women historians most probably in order to

  1.  provide support for an assertion made in the preceding sentence
  2.  raise a question that is answered in the last sentence of the passage
  3.  introduce an opinion that challenges a statement made in the first sentence of the passage
  4.  offer an alternative view to the one attributed in the passage to working-class mothers
  5.  point out a contradiction inherent in the traditional view of child labor reform as it is presented in the passage

Solution : provide support for an assertion made in the preceding sentence

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Q160. > Women’s grassroots activism and their vision of a new civic > consciousness lay at the heart of social reform in the United States > throughout the Progressive Era, the period between the depression of > 1893 and America’s entry into the Second World War. Though largely > disenfranchised except for school elections, white middle-class women > reformers won a variety of victories, notably in the improvement of > working conditions, especially for women and children. Ironically, > though, child labor legislation pitted women of different classes > against one another. To the reformers, child labor and industrial > homework were equally inhumane practices that should be outlawed, but, > as a number of women historians have recently observed, working-class > mothers did not always share this view. Given the precarious finances > of working-class families and the necessity of pooling the wages of as > many family members as possible, working-class families viewed the > passage and enforcement of stringent child labor statutes as a > personal economic disaster and made strenuous efforts to circumvent > child labor laws. Yet reformers rarely understood this resistance in > terms of the desperate economic situation of working class families, > interpreting it instead as evidence of poor parenting. This is not to > dispute women reformers’ perception of child labor as a terribly > exploitative practice, but their understanding of child labor and > their legislative solutions for ending it failed to take account of > the economic needs of working-class families. The passage suggests that which of the following was a reason for the difference of opinion between working-class mothers and women reformers on the issue of child labor?

  1.  Reformers’ belief that industrial homework was preferable to child labor outside the home
  2.  Reformers’ belief that child labor laws should pertain to working conditions but not to pay
  3.  Working-class mothers’ resentment at reformers’ attempts to interfere with their parenting
  4.  Working-class mothers’ belief that child labor was an inhumane practice
  5.  Working-class families’ need for every employable member of their families to earn Money

Solution : Working-class families’ need for every employable member of their families to earn Money
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Solution :

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