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Reading Comprehension

Reading Comprehension: English Reading Comprehension Exercises with Answers, Sample Passages for Reading Comprehension Test for GRE, CAT, IELTS preparation

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English Reading Comprehension Test Questions and Answers. Improve your ability to read and comprehend English Passages

Q396. > There are good reasons why the ‘Heart of Asia’ conference, part of a > 14-nation process begun in 2011 to facilitate the development and > security of Afghanistan, is so named. The obvious one is geographical, > as Afghanistan lies at the junction of Central, South and East Asia, > and also of the ancient trading routes from China and India to Europe. > Today it is also a focal point for the region’s biggest challenge of > terrorism; some of the far-reaching battles against al-Qaeda, Islamic > State, etc. will be decided on the battlegrounds of Afghanistan. For > India, putting terror centre stage at the Heart of Asia declaration in > Amritsar was thus timely and necessary. In tandem, Afghan President > Ashraf Ghani and Prime Minister Narendra Modi focussed their concerns > on cross-border terrorism emanating from Pakistan, something even > Pakistan’s traditional allies at the conference, including China, > Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Turkey, found difficult to counter. The case > Mr. Ghani made was clear: progress and development in Afghanistan are > meaningless and unsustainable without peace, and peace is contingent > on Pakistan ending support to terror groups such the Haqqani network > and Lashkar-e-Taiba. He dared Pakistan to use its proposed development > grant to Afghanistan to fight terror on its own soil. > > However, if every window for engagement with Pakistan is closed for > India and Afghanistan, the two countries must closely consider what > their next step will be. A lack of engagement may, in the short term, > yield some pressure on Pakistan’s leadership to act, as it did briefly > after the Pathankot attack. But in the long run it may deplete the two > countries of their limited leverage as Pakistan’s neighbours. It may, > for all the affirmations of mutual ties, also succeed in driving more > obstacles to trade between India and Afghanistan. In the past year, > the cornering of Pakistan by its South Asian neighbours has only > yielded deeper ties for Islamabad with Beijing and Moscow, pushed > Kabul closer to Central Asia, and moved New Delhi towards multilateral > groupings to the east and south. As a result, the measures India and > Afghanistan have envisaged in order to avoid Pakistan, such as land > trade from the Chabahar port and a dedicated air corridor between > Delhi and Kabul, may prove to be insufficient by the time they are put > in place, even as Afghanistan is connected more closely via a rail > line from China’s Yiwu and Tehran. The Heart of Asia process thus > remains critical to forging cooperation to realise Afghanistan’s > potential to be a vibrant Asian “hub”. What are the measures foreseen by India and Afghanistan to avoid their neighbouring country?

  1.  Including Russia and Europe to tackle the situation.
  2.  Forging cooperation to realise Afghanistan’s potential to be a vibrant Asian “hub”.
  3.  Starting land trade from the Chabahar port and a dedicated air corridor between Delhi and Kabul
  4.  Deepening ties of Islamabad with Beijing and Moscow and, pushing Kabul closer to Central Asia
  5.  Driving more obstacles to trade between India and Afghanistan.

Solution : Starting land trade from the Chabahar port and a dedicated air corridor between Delhi and Kabul
Q397. > There are good reasons why the ‘Heart of Asia’ conference, part of a > 14-nation process begun in 2011 to facilitate the development and > security of Afghanistan, is so named. The obvious one is geographical, > as Afghanistan lies at the junction of Central, South and East Asia, > and also of the ancient trading routes from China and India to Europe. > Today it is also a focal point for the region’s biggest challenge of > terrorism; some of the far-reaching battles against al-Qaeda, Islamic > State, etc. will be decided on the battlegrounds of Afghanistan. For > India, putting terror centre stage at the Heart of Asia declaration in > Amritsar was thus timely and necessary. In tandem, Afghan President > Ashraf Ghani and Prime Minister Narendra Modi focussed their concerns > on cross-border terrorism emanating from Pakistan, something even > Pakistan’s traditional allies at the conference, including China, > Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Turkey, found difficult to counter. The case > Mr. Ghani made was clear: progress and development in Afghanistan are > meaningless and unsustainable without peace, and peace is contingent > on Pakistan ending support to terror groups such the Haqqani network > and Lashkar-e-Taiba. He dared Pakistan to use its proposed development > grant to Afghanistan to fight terror on its own soil. > > However, if every window for engagement with Pakistan is closed for > India and Afghanistan, the two countries must closely consider what > their next step will be. A lack of engagement may, in the short term, > yield some pressure on Pakistan’s leadership to act, as it did briefly > after the Pathankot attack. But in the long run it may deplete the two > countries of their limited leverage as Pakistan’s neighbours. It may, > for all the affirmations of mutual ties, also succeed in driving more > obstacles to trade between India and Afghanistan. In the past year, > the cornering of Pakistan by its South Asian neighbours has only > yielded deeper ties for Islamabad with Beijing and Moscow, pushed > Kabul closer to Central Asia, and moved New Delhi towards multilateral > groupings to the east and south. As a result, the measures India and > Afghanistan have envisaged in order to avoid Pakistan, such as land > trade from the Chabahar port and a dedicated air corridor between > Delhi and Kabul, may prove to be insufficient by the time they are put > in place, even as Afghanistan is connected more closely via a rail > line from China’s Yiwu and Tehran. The Heart of Asia process thus > remains critical to forging cooperation to realise Afghanistan’s > potential to be a vibrant Asian “hub”. Which major issue was discussed by President of Afghanistan and the Prime Minister of India?

  1.  Cross-border terrorism emanating from Pakistan
  2.  Strengthening ties between India and Afghanistan
  3.  Putting pressure on Pakistan for all its wrong deeds
  4.  Measures to avaid another attack like the Pathankot attack
  5.  Including China, Saudi Arabia and the UAE to the Heart of Asia treaty

Solution : Cross-border terrorism emanating from Pakistan

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Q398. > There are good reasons why the ‘Heart of Asia’ conference, part of a > 14-nation process begun in 2011 to facilitate the development and > security of Afghanistan, is so named. The obvious one is geographical, > as Afghanistan lies at the junction of Central, South and East Asia, > and also of the ancient trading routes from China and India to Europe. > Today it is also a focal point for the region’s biggest challenge of > terrorism; some of the far-reaching battles against al-Qaeda, Islamic > State, etc. will be decided on the battlegrounds of Afghanistan. For > India, putting terror centre stage at the Heart of Asia declaration in > Amritsar was thus timely and necessary. In tandem, Afghan President > Ashraf Ghani and Prime Minister Narendra Modi focussed their concerns > on cross-border terrorism emanating from Pakistan, something even > Pakistan’s traditional allies at the conference, including China, > Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Turkey, found difficult to counter. The case > Mr. Ghani made was clear: progress and development in Afghanistan are > meaningless and unsustainable without peace, and peace is contingent > on Pakistan ending support to terror groups such the Haqqani network > and Lashkar-e-Taiba. He dared Pakistan to use its proposed development > grant to Afghanistan to fight terror on its own soil. > > However, if every window for engagement with Pakistan is closed for > India and Afghanistan, the two countries must closely consider what > their next step will be. A lack of engagement may, in the short term, > yield some pressure on Pakistan’s leadership to act, as it did briefly > after the Pathankot attack. But in the long run it may deplete the two > countries of their limited leverage as Pakistan’s neighbours. It may, > for all the affirmations of mutual ties, also succeed in driving more > obstacles to trade between India and Afghanistan. In the past year, > the cornering of Pakistan by its South Asian neighbours has only > yielded deeper ties for Islamabad with Beijing and Moscow, pushed > Kabul closer to Central Asia, and moved New Delhi towards multilateral > groupings to the east and south. As a result, the measures India and > Afghanistan have envisaged in order to avoid Pakistan, such as land > trade from the Chabahar port and a dedicated air corridor between > Delhi and Kabul, may prove to be insufficient by the time they are put > in place, even as Afghanistan is connected more closely via a rail > line from China’s Yiwu and Tehran. The Heart of Asia process thus > remains critical to forging cooperation to realise Afghanistan’s > potential to be a vibrant Asian “hub”. Which among the following statement is not true according to the passage?

  1.  Lack of engagement , in the short term, yield some pressure on Pakistan’s leadership to act on the current scenario of cross-border terrorism.
  2.  Pakistan ending support to terror group such as the Haqqani network and Lashkar-e-Taiba will not be of much influence in the situation of cross-border terrorism.
  3.  Afghanistan is the focal point for the region’s biggest challenge of terrorism.
  4.  Cornering of Pakistan by its South Asian neighbours has only yielded deeper ties for Islamabad with Beijing and Moscow.
  5.  India and Afghanistan are planning for better interconnectivity such as land trade from the Chabahar port and a dedicated air corridor between Delhi and Kabul.

Solution : Pakistan ending support to terror group such as the Haqqani network and Lashkar-e-Taiba will not be of much influence in the situation of cross-border terrorism.
Q399. > There are good reasons why the ‘Heart of Asia’ conference, part of a > 14-nation process begun in 2011 to facilitate the development and > security of Afghanistan, is so named. The obvious one is geographical, > as Afghanistan lies at the junction of Central, South and East Asia, > and also of the ancient trading routes from China and India to Europe. > Today it is also a focal point for the region’s biggest challenge of > terrorism; some of the far-reaching battles against al-Qaeda, Islamic > State, etc. will be decided on the battlegrounds of Afghanistan. For > India, putting terror centre stage at the Heart of Asia declaration in > Amritsar was thus timely and necessary. In tandem, Afghan President > Ashraf Ghani and Prime Minister Narendra Modi focussed their concerns > on cross-border terrorism emanating from Pakistan, something even > Pakistan’s traditional allies at the conference, including China, > Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Turkey, found difficult to counter. The case > Mr. Ghani made was clear: progress and development in Afghanistan are > meaningless and unsustainable without peace, and peace is contingent > on Pakistan ending support to terror groups such the Haqqani network > and Lashkar-e-Taiba. He dared Pakistan to use its proposed development > grant to Afghanistan to fight terror on its own soil. > > However, if every window for engagement with Pakistan is closed for > India and Afghanistan, the two countries must closely consider what > their next step will be. A lack of engagement may, in the short term, > yield some pressure on Pakistan’s leadership to act, as it did briefly > after the Pathankot attack. But in the long run it may deplete the two > countries of their limited leverage as Pakistan’s neighbours. It may, > for all the affirmations of mutual ties, also succeed in driving more > obstacles to trade between India and Afghanistan. In the past year, > the cornering of Pakistan by its South Asian neighbours has only > yielded deeper ties for Islamabad with Beijing and Moscow, pushed > Kabul closer to Central Asia, and moved New Delhi towards multilateral > groupings to the east and south. As a result, the measures India and > Afghanistan have envisaged in order to avoid Pakistan, such as land > trade from the Chabahar port and a dedicated air corridor between > Delhi and Kabul, may prove to be insufficient by the time they are put > in place, even as Afghanistan is connected more closely via a rail > line from China’s Yiwu and Tehran. The Heart of Asia process thus > remains critical to forging cooperation to realise Afghanistan’s > potential to be a vibrant Asian “hub”. Why Pakistan is being considered as the breeding ground for cross-border terrorism?

  1.  Pakistan is initiating World War III
  2.  Pakistan’s allies are supporting it in ceasing trade with India and Afghanistan
  3.  Pakistan has opposed the ‘Heart of Asia’ conference
  4.  Islamabad has close ties with Bejing and Moscow.
  5.  Pakistan is providing support to terror groups such the Haqqani network and Lashkar-e-Taiba.

Solution : Pakistan is providing support to terror groups such the Haqqani network and Lashkar-e-Taiba.

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Q400. > There are good reasons why the ‘Heart of Asia’ conference, part of a > 14-nation process begun in 2011 to facilitate the development and > security of Afghanistan, is so named. The obvious one is geographical, > as Afghanistan lies at the junction of Central, South and East Asia, > and also of the ancient trading routes from China and India to Europe. > Today it is also a focal point for the region’s biggest challenge of > terrorism; some of the far-reaching battles against al-Qaeda, Islamic > State, etc. will be decided on the battlegrounds of Afghanistan. For > India, putting terror centre stage at the Heart of Asia declaration in > Amritsar was thus timely and necessary. In tandem, Afghan President > Ashraf Ghani and Prime Minister Narendra Modi focussed their concerns > on cross-border terrorism emanating from Pakistan, something even > Pakistan’s traditional allies at the conference, including China, > Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Turkey, found difficult to counter. The case > Mr. Ghani made was clear: progress and development in Afghanistan are > meaningless and unsustainable without peace, and peace is contingent > on Pakistan ending support to terror groups such the Haqqani network > and Lashkar-e-Taiba. He dared Pakistan to use its proposed development > grant to Afghanistan to fight terror on its own soil. > > However, if every window for engagement with Pakistan is closed for > India and Afghanistan, the two countries must closely consider what > their next step will be. A lack of engagement may, in the short term, > yield some pressure on Pakistan’s leadership to act, as it did briefly > after the Pathankot attack. But in the long run it may deplete the two > countries of their limited leverage as Pakistan’s neighbours. It may, > for all the affirmations of mutual ties, also succeed in driving more > obstacles to trade between India and Afghanistan. In the past year, > the cornering of Pakistan by its South Asian neighbours has only > yielded deeper ties for Islamabad with Beijing and Moscow, pushed > Kabul closer to Central Asia, and moved New Delhi towards multilateral > groupings to the east and south. As a result, the measures India and > Afghanistan have envisaged in order to avoid Pakistan, such as land > trade from the Chabahar port and a dedicated air corridor between > Delhi and Kabul, may prove to be insufficient by the time they are put > in place, even as Afghanistan is connected more closely via a rail > line from China’s Yiwu and Tehran. The Heart of Asia process thus > remains critical to forging cooperation to realise Afghanistan’s > potential to be a vibrant Asian “hub”. According to the author, what impact will it have if India and Afghanistan cease engagement with Pakistan?

  1.  A lack of engagement may, in the short term, yield some pressure on Pakistan’s leadership to act
  2.  In the long run, such initiative may succeed in driving more obstacles to trade between India and Afghanistan.
  3.  It will definitely put pressure on Pakistan to surrender it’s terror groups, and it will be a measure confirming peace among international borders.
  4.  None of these
  5.  All of the above

Solution : All of the above
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Solution :

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