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Reading Comprehension

Reading Comprehension: English Reading Comprehension Exercises with Answers, Sample Passages for Reading Comprehension Test for GRE, CAT, IELTS preparation

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English Reading Comprehension Test Questions and Answers. Improve your ability to read and comprehend English Passages

Q46. > It’s not that independent political movements with noble objectives > have not been tried before in India. Loksatta is a prime example of an > organisation that has done great work for years. But what’s happening > in Delhi is incredible. With the AAP coming in a clear number two and > decimating the Congress, it is for the first time since N T Rama Rao > led the TDP to an astounding election win in 1983 that a party formed > a year ago has done so incredibly well. And finally, it also means > that if strategies are executed well, what the AAP has done in Delhi > can be replicated. Movements like Loksatta that have been slogging for > years with pretty much the same objectives as the AAP — bringing in a > citizen-led alternative to current political dispensations that are > seen as nepotistic and corrupt and which will not change; be > citizen-led and democratic in functioning as opposed to dynastic rule, > clearly will see more than a bright ray of hope in AAP’s showing. AAP > made it big this time primarily thanks to the genius of Arvind > Kejriwal, but also because of other factors like cloud computing, > which has removed the need for expensive technology equipment to > leverage technology and the power of social media. AAP used a solution > called Voice Tree which took away the need to set up a massive call > centre to make calls to citizens. Remember, political parties have > long used recorded messages through cold calls, but that is eerie and > perhaps counter-productive. What Voice Tree did was provide the AAP > with the power to make any person, anywhere in the world, a volunteer > for the party at a very low cost. > > > A volunteer called a toll-free central number and from there, he/she > was connected to a random Delhi number. Once connected, the volunteer > could make a personalised sales pitch for AAP, a far more powerful > spiel than a canned message. And once made, the called number would be > moved to a called database so that every volunteer had a fresh citizen > to approach. Then there’s analytics. Political parties in India have > used analytics for every seat, segment, etc, trying to figure out what > works best at a hyper-local level. But analytics technologies didn’t > come cheap. Today however, thanks to cloud platforms where a user only > pays for the service rather than install compute equipment, expensive > software, etc, literally anyone can use analytics and transform raw > data into information that is valuable. The power of social media has > also changed the game. > > The AAP no longer needed to go after mainstream media to ensure they > carried AAP’s view points. The power of social media ensured that > mainstream media had to go after AAP or risk losing relevance. In the > Tarun Tejpal case, the power of mainstream media has been shattered by > the advent of the social media, with its unfettered ability to set its > own agenda on its own terms. No longer is it possible for mainstream > media to decide what issues to discuss, and what to brush under the > carpet. Clearly, much has changed over the past few years since > organisations like Loksatta tried to make a difference. There are > trends today that surely organisations like Loksatta are looking at > closely in order to replicate AAP’s success. However, this also means > that while AAP became a big hit in Delhi, it may not succeed elsewhere > where strong movements already exist, unless of course, the AAP wave > is so powerful that all these organisations decide to stand under the > Kejriwal umbrella. AAP has defeated which of the following parties ?

  1.  TMC
  2.  Telgu Desham Party
  3.  Congress part
  4.  SP
  5.  None of these

Solution : Congress part
Q47. > I worked as health secretary for about five years from the middle of > 1962 to the middle of 1967. Thereafter I worked as finance secretary > until the end of 1969. Indiscipline was rampant in the health > department. Intense lobbying to secure plum postings was the order of > the day. Ministers, legislators, senior officers and other influential > people openly pleaded the cause of their proteges. The Health Minister > was an honest, well-meaning politician. He approved my proposals to > bring about some system and objectivity in postings and transfers and > put an end to lobbying. But those efforts met with only limited > success. > > > Doctors succeeded in getting desired postings by resorting to bribery. > On the eve of the elections, the then minister sent down over 100 > transfer orders from his camp office. They were in conflict with the > guidelines and quite a few were confusing in as much as two doctors > were posted to the same place, or one person was posted to more than > one post. I did not carry out the orders. I submitted a note to Chief > Minister through the Chief Secretary pointing out why the orders > should not be implemented. > > The Chief Secretary supported me. The Chief Minister decided that the > minister’s orders should not be implemented. All the doctors who had > paid money were disappointed. In several other departments also > corruption became widespread. In the works departments corruption had > existed since a long time in the matter of awarding contracts. Now > bribes were freely offered to secure transfer to particular posts, and > even for getting promotions. > > As Finance Secretary I found that the finances of the state were in a > precarious condition. Financial discipline had evaporated. Long before > the advent of the wireless and the telephone, the British had included > in the Treasury Code a rule (Rule 27) empowering collectors to draw > money from the treasury to meet emergencies like floods, earthquakes, > devastating fires, etc. To my dismay I found that collectors were > freely drawing money for all manner of trivial purposes under Rule 27 > of the Treasury Code. In one case a collector had drawn money under > the rule to buy a staff car for the SDO of another district. All > checks and balances had disappeared. There was no accountability and > any one could do what he pleased. Resorting to a number of harsh > measures I could restore a measure of financial discipline. But the > administration continued to be in disarray. When the health minister sent down 100 transfer orders from his camp office, how did the author react? (A) He immediately obeyed the minister. (B) He did not carry out the orders . (C) He submitted a note to Chief Minister through the Chief Secretary.

  1.  Only (A)
  2.  Only (B)
  3.  Only (A) & (B)
  4.  Only (B) & (C)
  5.  Only (A) & (C)

Solution : Only (B) & (C)

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Q48. > I worked as health secretary for about five years from the middle of > 1962 to the middle of 1967. Thereafter I worked as finance secretary > until the end of 1969. Indiscipline was rampant in the health > department. Intense lobbying to secure plum postings was the order of > the day. Ministers, legislators, senior officers and other influential > people openly pleaded the cause of their proteges. The Health Minister > was an honest, well-meaning politician. He approved my proposals to > bring about some system and objectivity in postings and transfers and > put an end to lobbying. But those efforts met with only limited > success. > > > Doctors succeeded in getting desired postings by resorting to bribery. > On the eve of the elections, the then minister sent down over 100 > transfer orders from his camp office. They were in conflict with the > guidelines and quite a few were confusing in as much as two doctors > were posted to the same place, or one person was posted to more than > one post. I did not carry out the orders. I submitted a note to Chief > Minister through the Chief Secretary pointing out why the orders > should not be implemented. > > The Chief Secretary supported me. The Chief Minister decided that the > minister’s orders should not be implemented. All the doctors who had > paid money were disappointed. In several other departments also > corruption became widespread. In the works departments corruption had > existed since a long time in the matter of awarding contracts. Now > bribes were freely offered to secure transfer to particular posts, and > even for getting promotions. > > As Finance Secretary I found that the finances of the state were in a > precarious condition. Financial discipline had evaporated. Long before > the advent of the wireless and the telephone, the British had included > in the Treasury Code a rule (Rule 27) empowering collectors to draw > money from the treasury to meet emergencies like floods, earthquakes, > devastating fires, etc. To my dismay I found that collectors were > freely drawing money for all manner of trivial purposes under Rule 27 > of the Treasury Code. In one case a collector had drawn money under > the rule to buy a staff car for the SDO of another district. All > checks and balances had disappeared. There was no accountability and > any one could do what he pleased. Resorting to a number of harsh > measures I could restore a measure of financial discipline. But the > administration continued to be in disarray. What happened when the Chief Minister decided that the minister’s orders should not be implemented?

  1.  The author was very happy.
  2.  The author arranged a tea party to celebrate his victory.
  3.  The doctors resigned and left the hospitals.
  4.  The health minister submitted his resignation.
  5.  All the doctors who had paid money were disappointed.

Solution : All the doctors who had paid money were disappointed.
Q49. > It’s not that independent political movements with noble objectives > have not been tried before in India. Loksatta is a prime example of an > organisation that has done great work for years. But what’s happening > in Delhi is incredible. With the AAP coming in a clear number two and > decimating the Congress, it is for the first time since N T Rama Rao > led the TDP to an astounding election win in 1983 that a party formed > a year ago has done so incredibly well. And finally, it also means > that if strategies are executed well, what the AAP has done in Delhi > can be replicated. Movements like Loksatta that have been slogging for > years with pretty much the same objectives as the AAP — bringing in a > citizen-led alternative to current political dispensations that are > seen as nepotistic and corrupt and which will not change; be > citizen-led and democratic in functioning as opposed to dynastic rule, > clearly will see more than a bright ray of hope in AAP’s showing. AAP > made it big this time primarily thanks to the genius of Arvind > Kejriwal, but also because of other factors like cloud computing, > which has removed the need for expensive technology equipment to > leverage technology and the power of social media. AAP used a solution > called Voice Tree which took away the need to set up a massive call > centre to make calls to citizens. Remember, political parties have > long used recorded messages through cold calls, but that is eerie and > perhaps counter-productive. What Voice Tree did was provide the AAP > with the power to make any person, anywhere in the world, a volunteer > for the party at a very low cost. > > > A volunteer called a toll-free central number and from there, he/she > was connected to a random Delhi number. Once connected, the volunteer > could make a personalised sales pitch for AAP, a far more powerful > spiel than a canned message. And once made, the called number would be > moved to a called database so that every volunteer had a fresh citizen > to approach. Then there’s analytics. Political parties in India have > used analytics for every seat, segment, etc, trying to figure out what > works best at a hyper-local level. But analytics technologies didn’t > come cheap. Today however, thanks to cloud platforms where a user only > pays for the service rather than install compute equipment, expensive > software, etc, literally anyone can use analytics and transform raw > data into information that is valuable. The power of social media has > also changed the game. > > The AAP no longer needed to go after mainstream media to ensure they > carried AAP’s view points. The power of social media ensured that > mainstream media had to go after AAP or risk losing relevance. In the > Tarun Tejpal case, the power of mainstream media has been shattered by > the advent of the social media, with its unfettered ability to set its > own agenda on its own terms. No longer is it possible for mainstream > media to decide what issues to discuss, and what to brush under the > carpet. Clearly, much has changed over the past few years since > organisations like Loksatta tried to make a difference. There are > trends today that surely organisations like Loksatta are looking at > closely in order to replicate AAP’s success. However, this also means > that while AAP became a big hit in Delhi, it may not succeed elsewhere > where strong movements already exist, unless of course, the AAP wave > is so powerful that all these organisations decide to stand under the > Kejriwal umbrella. Which of the following is true about (AAP) Aam Adami Party ?

  1.  AAP has broken all the previous record of Congress.
  2.  The main motive of AAP is to bring Jan Lokpal Bill.
  3.  Because of media AAP got special attention.
  4.  All of the above
  5.  None of the above

Solution : None of the above

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Q50. > It’s not that independent political movements with noble objectives > have not been tried before in India. Loksatta is a prime example of an > organisation that has done great work for years. But what’s happening > in Delhi is incredible. With the AAP coming in a clear number two and > decimating the Congress, it is for the first time since N T Rama Rao > led the TDP to an astounding election win in 1983 that a party formed > a year ago has done so incredibly well. And finally, it also means > that if strategies are executed well, what the AAP has done in Delhi > can be replicated. Movements like Loksatta that have been slogging for > years with pretty much the same objectives as the AAP — bringing in a > citizen-led alternative to current political dispensations that are > seen as nepotistic and corrupt and which will not change; be > citizen-led and democratic in functioning as opposed to dynastic rule, > clearly will see more than a bright ray of hope in AAP’s showing. AAP > made it big this time primarily thanks to the genius of Arvind > Kejriwal, but also because of other factors like cloud computing, > which has removed the need for expensive technology equipment to > leverage technology and the power of social media. AAP used a solution > called Voice Tree which took away the need to set up a massive call > centre to make calls to citizens. Remember, political parties have > long used recorded messages through cold calls, but that is eerie and > perhaps counter-productive. What Voice Tree did was provide the AAP > with the power to make any person, anywhere in the world, a volunteer > for the party at a very low cost. > > > A volunteer called a toll-free central number and from there, he/she > was connected to a random Delhi number. Once connected, the volunteer > could make a personalised sales pitch for AAP, a far more powerful > spiel than a canned message. And once made, the called number would be > moved to a called database so that every volunteer had a fresh citizen > to approach. Then there’s analytics. Political parties in India have > used analytics for every seat, segment, etc, trying to figure out what > works best at a hyper-local level. But analytics technologies didn’t > come cheap. Today however, thanks to cloud platforms where a user only > pays for the service rather than install compute equipment, expensive > software, etc, literally anyone can use analytics and transform raw > data into information that is valuable. The power of social media has > also changed the game. > > The AAP no longer needed to go after mainstream media to ensure they > carried AAP’s view points. The power of social media ensured that > mainstream media had to go after AAP or risk losing relevance. In the > Tarun Tejpal case, the power of mainstream media has been shattered by > the advent of the social media, with its unfettered ability to set its > own agenda on its own terms. No longer is it possible for mainstream > media to decide what issues to discuss, and what to brush under the > carpet. Clearly, much has changed over the past few years since > organisations like Loksatta tried to make a difference. There are > trends today that surely organisations like Loksatta are looking at > closely in order to replicate AAP’s success. However, this also means > that while AAP became a big hit in Delhi, it may not succeed elsewhere > where strong movements already exist, unless of course, the AAP wave > is so powerful that all these organisations decide to stand under the > Kejriwal umbrella. What is / are the primary reasons behind the success of AAP ?

  1.  Well executed strategies.
  2.  Independent political movement with noble objectives.
  3.  Support of political parties.
  4.  Approach to fresh citizen.
  5.  None of the above

Solution : Independent political movement with noble objectives.
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Solution :

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