reading-comprehension

Reading Comprehension

Reading Comprehension: English Reading Comprehension Exercises with Answers, Sample Passages for Reading Comprehension Test for GRE, CAT, IELTS preparation

assess-yourself
Take English Reading Comprehension Test
view-results
View English Reading Comprehension Test Results

English Reading Comprehension Test Questions and Answers. Improve your ability to read and comprehend English Passages

Q86. > Just as there are basic laws and principles that control your physical > world, there are basic laws and principles that control your mental > world as well. Before you can hope to operate your human success > system properly, you need to know the basic laws that determine your > behavior and affect your very being. In this regard, you have no > choice. You cannot decide to bypass these laws in an attempt to negate > their application. They are present in all mental working and will > always operate successfully to bring about the results you keep > telling your mind you want. > > The human mind is very much like a sophisticated electronic computer. > When you acquire any new piece of advanced equipment, you normally > take some time to carefully read the manual and basic operating > instructions before turning it on to make it work. Operating > instructions are important. They tell you how to get maximum > performance out of the device, taking into account the specific tasks > it was designed to perform. It should be the same with operating your > own miraculous built-in machine. You were born as the most advanced > living organism in the world, yet you lack the precise knowledge to > get the most out of your internal success system. Of course, your > automatic goal-stirring mechanism is always successful. But it is > probably more successful at getting you what you don’t want in life > rather than what you do want. Understanding the mental laws will help > you get what you do want, more often. The subject under discussion in the passage is

  1.  an advanced computer
  2.  all complicated machines
  3.  human mind
  4.  human spirit
  5.  none of the above

Solution : human mind
Q87. > Just as there are basic laws and principles that control your physical > world, there are basic laws and principles that control your mental > world as well. Before you can hope to operate your human success > system properly, you need to know the basic laws that determine your > behavior and affect your very being. In this regard, you have no > choice. You cannot decide to bypass these laws in an attempt to negate > their application. They are present in all mental working and will > always operate successfully to bring about the results you keep > telling your mind you want. > > The human mind is very much like a sophisticated electronic computer. > When you acquire any new piece of advanced equipment, you normally > take some time to carefully read the manual and basic operating > instructions before turning it on to make it work. Operating > instructions are important. They tell you how to get maximum > performance out of the device, taking into account the specific tasks > it was designed to perform. It should be the same with operating your > own miraculous built-in machine. You were born as the most advanced > living organism in the world, yet you lack the precise knowledge to > get the most out of your internal success system. Of course, your > automatic goal-stirring mechanism is always successful. But it is > probably more successful at getting you what you don’t want in life > rather than what you do want. Understanding the mental laws will help > you get what you do want, more often. The objective of the passage is to

  1.  help the reader in being successful
  2.  entertain the reader
  3.  familiarize the reader with computers
  4.  discuss all complicated machines
  5.  cultivate good habits

Solution : help the reader in being successful

Grammar Guru

Free Online Contest on English Grammar and Vocabulary.20 mins Only.

  • All Participants get Participation Certificates to boost your Resume
  • Cash Vouchers for the top 100 weekly winners

Participation Now using Laptop/ Desktop/ Tab/ Mobile.



Q88. > Just as there are basic laws and principles that control your physical > world, there are basic laws and principles that control your mental > world as well. Before you can hope to operate your human success > system properly, you need to know the basic laws that determine your > behavior and affect your very being. In this regard, you have no > choice. You cannot decide to bypass these laws in an attempt to negate > their application. They are present in all mental working and will > always operate successfully to bring about the results you keep > telling your mind you want. > > The human mind is very much like a sophisticated electronic computer. > When you acquire any new piece of advanced equipment, you normally > take some time to carefully read the manual and basic operating > instructions before turning it on to make it work. Operating > instructions are important. They tell you how to get maximum > performance out of the device, taking into account the specific tasks > it was designed to perform. It should be the same with operating your > own miraculous built-in machine. You were born as the most advanced > living organism in the world, yet you lack the precise knowledge to > get the most out of your internal success system. Of course, your > automatic goal-stirring mechanism is always successful. But it is > probably more successful at getting you what you don’t want in life > rather than what you do want. Understanding the mental laws will help > you get what you do want, more often. The word ‘negate’ in the passage means

  1.  refuse to accept
  2.  deny (the existence of)
  3.  hamper
  4.  obviate
  5.  excruciate

Solution : deny (the existence of)
Q89. > Just as there are basic laws and principles that control your physical > world, there are basic laws and principles that control your mental > world as well. Before you can hope to operate your human success > system properly, you need to know the basic laws that determine your > behavior and affect your very being. In this regard, you have no > choice. You cannot decide to bypass these laws in an attempt to negate > their application. They are present in all mental working and will > always operate successfully to bring about the results you keep > telling your mind you want. > > The human mind is very much like a sophisticated electronic computer. > When you acquire any new piece of advanced equipment, you normally > take some time to carefully read the manual and basic operating > instructions before turning it on to make it work. Operating > instructions are important. They tell you how to get maximum > performance out of the device, taking into account the specific tasks > it was designed to perform. It should be the same with operating your > own miraculous built-in machine. You were born as the most advanced > living organism in the world, yet you lack the precise knowledge to > get the most out of your internal success system. Of course, your > automatic goal-stirring mechanism is always successful. But it is > probably more successful at getting you what you don’t want in life > rather than what you do want. Understanding the mental laws will help > you get what you do want, more often. The phrase ‘miraculous built-in machine’ refers to

  1.  the human mind
  2.  the human limbs
  3.  one’s own computer
  4.  the modern machines
  5.  obsolete machine

Solution : the human mind

Campus Ambassador (Remote Internship)

Are you a college student? You can become a Campus Ambassador for LearningPundits. Promote our Online Contests to students from you college via email, Facebook, posters, WhatsApp and old-fashioned face to face communication
You will receive:
  • Stipend based on your performance
  • Internship Certificate to boost your Resume


Q90. > Right through history, imperial powers have clung to their possessions > to death. Why, then, did Britain in 1947 give up the jewel in its > crown, India? For many reasons. The independence struggle exposed the > hollowness of the white man’s burden. Provincial self-rule since 1935 > paved the way for full self-rule. Churchill resisted independence, but > the Labour Government of Atlee was anti-imperialist by ideology. > Finally, the Royal Indian Navy Mutiny in 1946 raised fears of a second > Sepoy Mutiny and convinced British waverers that it was safer to > withdraw gracefully. But politico-military explanations are not > enough. The basis of the empire was always money. The end of the > empire had much to do with the fact that British imperialism had > ceased to be profitable. World War II left Britain victorious but > deeply indebted, needing Marshall Aid and loans from the World Bank. > This constituted a strong financial case for ending the > no-longer-profitable empire. Empire building is expensive. > > > The US is spending one billion dollars a day in operations in Iraq > that fall well short of full-scale imperialism. Through the centuries, > empire building was costly, yet constantly undertaken because it > promised high returns. The investment was in armies and conquest. The > returns came through plunder and taxes from the conquered. No > immorality was attached to imperial loot and plunder. The biggest > conquerors were typically revered (hence titles like Alexander the > Great, Akbar the Great, and Peter the Great). The bigger and richer > the empire, the more the plunderer was admired. This mindset gradually > changed with the rise of new ideas about equality and governing for > the public good, ideas that culminated in the French and the American > Revolutions. Robert Clive was impeached for making a little money on > the side, and so was Warren Hastings. The white man’s burden came up > as a new moral rationale for conquest. It was supposedly for The > Princeton Review CAT sample paper 12 good of the conquered. This led > to much-muddled hypocrisy. On the one hand, the empire needed to be > profitable. On the other hand, the white man’s burden made brazen loot > impossible. > > An additional factor deterring loot was the 1857 Sepoy Mutiny. Though > crushed, it reminded the British vividly that they were a tiny ethnic > group who could not rule a gigantic subcontinent without the support > of important locals. After 1857, the British stopped annexing one > princely state after another, and instead treated the princes as > allies. Land revenue was fixed in absolute terms, partly to prevent > local unrest and partly to promote the notion of the white man’s > burden. The empire proclaimed itself to be a protector of the Indian > peasant against exploitation by Indian elites. This was denounced as > hypocrisy by nationalists like Dadabhai Naoroji in the 19th century, > who complained that land taxes led to an enormous drain from India to > Britain. Objective calculations by historians like Angus Maddison > suggest a drain of perhaps 1.6 percent of Indian Gross National > Product in the 19th century. > > But land revenue was more or less fixed by the Raj in absolute terms, > and so its real value diminished rapidly with inflation in the 20th > century. By World War II, India had ceased to be a profit centre for > the British Empire. Historically, conquered nations paid taxes to > finance fresh wars of the conqueror. India itself was asked to pay a > large sum at the end of World War I to help repair Britain’s finances. > But, as shown by historian Indivar Kamtekar, the independence movement > led by Gandhiji changed the political landscape, and made > mass-taxation of India increasingly difficult. By World War II, this > had become politically impossible. Far from taxing India to pay for > World War II, Britain actually began paying India for its contribution > of men and goods. Troops from white dominions like Australia, Canada, > and New Zealand were paid for entirely by these countries, but Indian > costs were shared by the British government. Britain paid in the form > of non-convertible sterling balances, which mounted swiftly. The > conqueror was paying the conquered, undercutting the profitability on > which all empire is founded. Churchill opposed this, and wanted to tax > India rather than owe it money. But he was overruled by Indian hands, > who said India would resist payment, and paralyze the war effort. Leo > Amery, Secretary of Sta te for India, said that when you are driving > in a taxi to the station to catch a life-or-death train, you do not > loudly announce that you have doubts whether to pay the fare. Thus, > World War II converted India from a debtor to a creditor with over one > billion pounds in sterling balances. > > Britain, meanwhile, became the biggest debtor in the world. It’s not > worth ruling over people who are afraid to tax. Which of the following was NOT a reason for the emergence of the ‘white man’s burden’ as a new rationale for empire building in India?

  1.  The emergence of the idea of the public good as an element of governance.
  2.  The decreasing returns from imperial loot and increasing costs of conquest
  3.  The weakening of the immorality attached to an emperor’s looting behaviour.
  4.  A growing awareness of the idea of equality among peoples.
  5.  None of these

Solution : The decreasing returns from imperial loot and increasing costs of conquest
Q{{($index+1)+((page-1)*LIMITPERPAGE)}}.

  1.  

Solution :

Grammar Guru

Free Online Contest on English Grammar and Vocabulary.20 mins Only.

  • All Participants get Participation Certificates to boost your Resume
  • Cash Vouchers for the top 100 weekly winners

Participation Now using Laptop/ Desktop/ Tab/ Mobile.



Math Whiz

Free Online Contest on Aptitude and Reasoning.20 mins Only.

  • All Participants get Participation Certificates to boost your Resume
  • Cash Vouchers for the top 100 weekly winners

Participation Now using Laptop/ Desktop/ Tab/ Mobile.



Campus Ambassador (Remote Internship)

Are you a college student? You can become a Campus Ambassador for LearningPundits. Promote our Online Contests to students from you college via email, Facebook, posters, WhatsApp and old-fashioned face to face communication
You will receive:
  • Stipend based on your performance
  • Internship Certificate to boost your Resume


Preparing for Aptitude Tests ? Please go through our courses on Aptitude Questions and try to answer our Online Aptitude Test Questions on Quantitative Aptitude.
Interested in evaluating your Reasoning Skills ? Please go through our courses on Logical Reasoning and Non-Verbal Reasoning to answer our Reasoning Questions.
Interested in learning English and checking your English Grammar ? Do a quick grammar check to evaluate your Basic English Grammar Skills. Improve your English Vocabulary by going through these Vocabulary words.
Wondering how to make a resume ? These resume format for freshers might be helpful. You can also submit your Resume for Review and look and Resume samples available there.
Preparing for an HR Interview or Group Discussion ? These HR interview questions and answers could help you do well in a typical HR interview. These group discussion tips could also be useful.
Searching for jobs ? We have thousand of Fresher Jobs. Feel free to browse through our extensive list of online jobs.


Weekly Contests Leaderboard


Rank - {{getRank($index,weeklyWinner)}}: {{weeklyWinner.userName}}

Loading...

« Previous Next »

Subscribe to our RSS Feed