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Reading Comprehension

Reading Comprehension: English Reading Comprehension Exercises with Answers, Sample Passages for Reading Comprehension Test for GRE, CAT, IELTS preparation

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English Reading Comprehension Test Questions and Answers. Improve your ability to read and comprehend English Passages

Q6. > The Constitution of India (Article 19) gives the right to all citizens > to “to move freely throughout the territory of India; to reside and > settle in any part of the territory of India” which leads to two main > types of migration: first, internal migration, i.e. migration within > one country, and second international migration, which means the > movement from one country to another. The reasons for migration can be > divided into two main aspects, the so-called “push” and “pull” > factors. Push factors are those in their old place which force people > to move. Pull factors are factors in the target country which > encourage people to move; these include peace and safety, a chance of > a better job, better education, social security, a better standard of > living in general as well as political and religious freedom. Since > the 1830s, international migration from India under British rule > comprised largely of unskilled workers from poorer socio-economic > groups who went to other colonised countries. > > > Between 1834 and 1937, nearly 30 million people left India and nearly > four-fifths returned. Post-Independence, migrants came from richer > socio-economic groups, from wealthier parts of the country and, with > the exception of the large migration to the Middle East, went > industrialised. The migrant stream to the United States in particular > has been the most highly educated, both compared to other immigrants > into the US, as well as to other Indian migrant streams abroad. Since > the 1990s, increasing numbers of skilled emigrants from India have > also been moving to Australia, Canada, New Zealand and Singapore. > > Migration of persons within national borders is far greater in > magnitude than migration across international borders and has enormous > potential to contribute to economic prosperity, social cohesion and > urban diversity. Internal migration is an essential and inevitable > component of the economic and social life of the country, given > regional imbalances and labour shortages, and safe migration should be > promoted to maximise its benefits. However, in the absence of a > coherent policy framework and strategy, migration imposes heavy costs > on human development through poor labour arrangements and working > conditions of migrants, and obstacles in their access to shelter, > education, healthcare and food. > > Migrants constitute a ‘floating’ and invisible population, alternating > between source and destination areas and remaining on the periphery of > society. In India, internal migration has been accorded very low > priority by the government, and policies of the Indian state have > largely failed in providing any form of legal or social protection to > this vulnerable group. As given in the passage which type of migration does occur frequently ?

  1.  Internal migration
  2.  International migration
  3.  Step migration
  4.  Impelled migration
  5.  None of these

Solution : Internal migration
Q7. > The Constitution of India (Article 19) gives the right to all citizens > to “to move freely throughout the territory of India; to reside and > settle in any part of the territory of India” which leads to two main > types of migration: first, internal migration, i.e. migration within > one country, and second international migration, which means the > movement from one country to another. The reasons for migration can be > divided into two main aspects, the so-called “push” and “pull” > factors. Push factors are those in their old place which force people > to move. Pull factors are factors in the target country which > encourage people to move; these include peace and safety, a chance of > a better job, better education, social security, a better standard of > living in general as well as political and religious freedom. Since > the 1830s, international migration from India under British rule > comprised largely of unskilled workers from poorer socio-economic > groups who went to other colonised countries. > > > Between 1834 and 1937, nearly 30 million people left India and nearly > four-fifths returned. Post-Independence, migrants came from richer > socio-economic groups, from wealthier parts of the country and, with > the exception of the large migration to the Middle East, went > industrialised. The migrant stream to the United States in particular > has been the most highly educated, both compared to other immigrants > into the US, as well as to other Indian migrant streams abroad. Since > the 1990s, increasing numbers of skilled emigrants from India have > also been moving to Australia, Canada, New Zealand and Singapore. > > Migration of persons within national borders is far greater in > magnitude than migration across international borders and has enormous > potential to contribute to economic prosperity, social cohesion and > urban diversity. Internal migration is an essential and inevitable > component of the economic and social life of the country, given > regional imbalances and labour shortages, and safe migration should be > promoted to maximise its benefits. However, in the absence of a > coherent policy framework and strategy, migration imposes heavy costs > on human development through poor labour arrangements and working > conditions of migrants, and obstacles in their access to shelter, > education, healthcare and food. > > Migrants constitute a ‘floating’ and invisible population, alternating > between source and destination areas and remaining on the periphery of > society. In India, internal migration has been accorded very low > priority by the government, and policies of the Indian state have > largely failed in providing any form of legal or social protection to > this vulnerable group. What is the main reason behind internal migration?

  1.  Various social, economic or political reasons
  2.  This may be due to marriage for work and moved with household
  3.  For higher education
  4.  For expansion of business
  5.  None of these

Solution : This may be due to marriage for work and moved with household

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Q8. > The Constitution of India (Article 19) gives the right to all citizens > to “to move freely throughout the territory of India; to reside and > settle in any part of the territory of India” which leads to two main > types of migration: first, internal migration, i.e. migration within > one country, and second international migration, which means the > movement from one country to another. The reasons for migration can be > divided into two main aspects, the so-called “push” and “pull” > factors. Push factors are those in their old place which force people > to move. Pull factors are factors in the target country which > encourage people to move; these include peace and safety, a chance of > a better job, better education, social security, a better standard of > living in general as well as political and religious freedom. Since > the 1830s, international migration from India under British rule > comprised largely of unskilled workers from poorer socio-economic > groups who went to other colonised countries. > > > Between 1834 and 1937, nearly 30 million people left India and nearly > four-fifths returned. Post-Independence, migrants came from richer > socio-economic groups, from wealthier parts of the country and, with > the exception of the large migration to the Middle East, went > industrialised. The migrant stream to the United States in particular > has been the most highly educated, both compared to other immigrants > into the US, as well as to other Indian migrant streams abroad. Since > the 1990s, increasing numbers of skilled emigrants from India have > also been moving to Australia, Canada, New Zealand and Singapore. > > Migration of persons within national borders is far greater in > magnitude than migration across international borders and has enormous > potential to contribute to economic prosperity, social cohesion and > urban diversity. Internal migration is an essential and inevitable > component of the economic and social life of the country, given > regional imbalances and labour shortages, and safe migration should be > promoted to maximise its benefits. However, in the absence of a > coherent policy framework and strategy, migration imposes heavy costs > on human development through poor labour arrangements and working > conditions of migrants, and obstacles in their access to shelter, > education, healthcare and food. > > Migrants constitute a ‘floating’ and invisible population, alternating > between source and destination areas and remaining on the periphery of > society. In India, internal migration has been accorded very low > priority by the government, and policies of the Indian state have > largely failed in providing any form of legal or social protection to > this vulnerable group. Which of the following is true in the context of the passage ?

  1.  The maximum migration takes place in the eastern countries.
  2.  International migration is far greater than internal migration.
  3.  Government of India is against brain drain.
  4.  Migrants only came from richer socio-economic groups.
  5.  None of these

Solution : None of these
Q9. > Corruption is a broad term covering a wide range of misuse of > entrusted funds and power for personal gain i.e. Theft, fraud, > nepotism, abuse of power etc. A corrupt act is often - but not > necessarily - illegal. In handling corruption you will often face a > Gray zones and dilemmas. In many countries, corruption is everywhere > and daily life is riddled with situations in the Gray zone between > legal and illegal. Many people accept petty corruption as a fact of > life. But the causes might differ, however, whether corruption results > from a need, a culture or simply from an opportunity too tempting not > to exploit, it influences the way we deal with it - or don’t deal with > it. Corruption can occur on different scales. There is corruption that > occurs as small favours between a small number of people (petty > corruption), corruption that affects the government on a large scale > (grand corruption), and corruption that is so prevalent that it is > part of the every day structure of society, including corruption as > one of the symptoms of organized crime (systemic corruption). > > The main reason for the spread of corruption is that the people in the > highest seat of power are corrupt unless the people at the top rung of > power are honest and free from corruption; there is absolutely no > possibility of eradicating corruption. If there is widespread > corruption in India , it is because the people at the top are really > corrupt .No subordinate will have to guts to be corrupt if the people > at the top of the administration are honest and take stern action > against the corrupt people .They can not be harsh to the corrupt > people , since it is through the corrupt subordinates that the people > at the top get their share of the bribes .If one can make a discrete > enquiry with the pavement traders, he can find out how much the police > and the corporation councillors collect from the pavement traders > .They say that the money so collected is shared by people from the top > to the bottom. If the head is corrupt, what will the limbs do? The > causes of corruption in India also include excessive regulations, > complicated taxes and licensing systems, numerous government > departments each with opaque bureaucracy and discretionary powers, > monopoly by government controlled institutions on certain goods and > services delivery, and the lack of transparent laws and processes. > There are significant variations in level of corruption as well as in > state government efforts to reduce corruption across India. A 2005 > study done by Transparency International in India found that more than > 62% of the people had firsthand experience of paying bribe or peddling > influence to get a job done in a public office.Taxes and bribes are > common between state borders; Transparency International estimates > that truckers pay annually 22,200 crores (US$ 4.5 billion) in bribes. > Government regulators and police share in bribe money, each to the > tune of 43% and 45% respectively. The en route stoppages including > those at checkpoints and entry-points take up to 11 hours in a day. > About 60% of these (forced) stoppages on road by concerned authorities > such as government regulators, police, forest, sales and excise, > octroi, weighing and measuring department are for extorting money. The > loss in productivity due to these stoppages is an important national > concern. The number of truck trips could increase by 40%, if forced > delays are avoided. According to a 2007 World Bank published report, > the travel time for a Delhi-Mumbai trip can be reduced by about 2 days > per trip if the corruption and associated regulatory stoppages to > extract bribes was eliminated. How many rupees are paid by truckers annually as per the study of transparency international ?

  1.  US $ 4.5 billion
  2.  Rs. 22, 000 crore
  3.  Rs. 22, 200 crore
  4.  US $ 4 billion
  5.  None of these

Solution : Rs. 22, 200 crore

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Q10. > Corruption is a broad term covering a wide range of misuse of > entrusted funds and power for personal gain i.e. Theft, fraud, > nepotism, abuse of power etc. A corrupt act is often - but not > necessarily - illegal. In handling corruption you will often face a > Gray zones and dilemmas. In many countries, corruption is everywhere > and daily life is riddled with situations in the Gray zone between > legal and illegal. Many people accept petty corruption as a fact of > life. But the causes might differ, however, whether corruption results > from a need, a culture or simply from an opportunity too tempting not > to exploit, it influences the way we deal with it - or don’t deal with > it. Corruption can occur on different scales. There is corruption that > occurs as small favours between a small number of people (petty > corruption), corruption that affects the government on a large scale > (grand corruption), and corruption that is so prevalent that it is > part of the every day structure of society, including corruption as > one of the symptoms of organized crime (systemic corruption). > > The main reason for the spread of corruption is that the people in the > highest seat of power are corrupt unless the people at the top rung of > power are honest and free from corruption; there is absolutely no > possibility of eradicating corruption. If there is widespread > corruption in India , it is because the people at the top are really > corrupt .No subordinate will have to guts to be corrupt if the people > at the top of the administration are honest and take stern action > against the corrupt people .They can not be harsh to the corrupt > people , since it is through the corrupt subordinates that the people > at the top get their share of the bribes .If one can make a discrete > enquiry with the pavement traders, he can find out how much the police > and the corporation councillors collect from the pavement traders > .They say that the money so collected is shared by people from the top > to the bottom. If the head is corrupt, what will the limbs do? The > causes of corruption in India also include excessive regulations, > complicated taxes and licensing systems, numerous government > departments each with opaque bureaucracy and discretionary powers, > monopoly by government controlled institutions on certain goods and > services delivery, and the lack of transparent laws and processes. > There are significant variations in level of corruption as well as in > state government efforts to reduce corruption across India. A 2005 > study done by Transparency International in India found that more than > 62% of the people had firsthand experience of paying bribe or peddling > influence to get a job done in a public office.Taxes and bribes are > common between state borders; Transparency International estimates > that truckers pay annually 22,200 crores (US$ 4.5 billion) in bribes. > Government regulators and police share in bribe money, each to the > tune of 43% and 45% respectively. The en route stoppages including > those at checkpoints and entry-points take up to 11 hours in a day. > About 60% of these (forced) stoppages on road by concerned authorities > such as government regulators, police, forest, sales and excise, > octroi, weighing and measuring department are for extorting money. The > loss in productivity due to these stoppages is an important national > concern. The number of truck trips could increase by 40%, if forced > delays are avoided. According to a 2007 World Bank published report, > the travel time for a Delhi-Mumbai trip can be reduced by about 2 days > per trip if the corruption and associated regulatory stoppages to > extract bribes was eliminated. What is the main objective of writer behind writing the passage?

  1.  It gives an idea of right and wrong judgement.
  2.  To remove the corruption from top to bottom.
  3.  To throw light on corruption
  4.  All of these

Solution : To throw light on corruption
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Solution :

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