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Reading Comprehension

Reading Comprehension: English Reading Comprehension Exercises with Answers, Sample Passages for Reading Comprehension Test for GRE, CAT, IELTS preparation

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English Reading Comprehension Test Questions and Answers. Improve your ability to read and comprehend English Passages

Q221. > Though the Cold War has ended, selective tactics are still continuing > for ensuring the military and economic dominance of developed > countries. Various types of technology denial regimes are still being > enforced which are now being mainly targeted against developing > countries like India. Today, we in India encounter twin problems. On > one side there is a large scale strengthening of our neighbours > through supply of arms and clandestine support to their nuclear and > missile programmes and on the other side all efforts are being made to > weaken our indigenous technology growth through control regimes and > dumping of low-tech systems, accompanied with high commercial pitch in > critical areas. Growth of indigenoustechnology and self-reliance are > the only answer to the problem. Thus in the environment around India, > the number of missiles and nuclear powers are continuously increasing > and destructive weapons continue to pile up around us, in spite of > arms reduction treaties. To understand the implications of various > types of warfare that may affect us, we need to take a quick look at > the evolution of war weaponry and the types of warfare. I am > highlighting this point for the reason that in less than a century we > could see change in the nature of warfare and its effects on society. > In early years of human history it was mostly direct human warfare. > During the twentieth century up to about 1990, the warfare was weapon > driven. The weapons used were guns, tanks, aircraft, ships, submarines > and the nuclear weapons deployed on land/sea/air and also > reconnaissance spacecraft. Proliferation of conventional nuclear and > biological weapons was at a peak owing to the competition between the > superpowers. The next phase, in a new form, has just started from 1990 > onwards. The world has graduated into economic warfare. The means used > is control of market forces through high technology. The participating > nations, apart from the USA, are Japan, the UK, France, Germany, > certain South-East Asia countries and a few others. The driving force > is the generation of wealth with certain types of economic doctrine. > The urgent issue we need to address collectively as a nation is, how > do we handle the tactics of economic and military dominance in this > new form coming from the backdoor? Today technology is the main driver > of economic development at the national level. Therefore, we have to > develop indigenous technologies to enhance our competitive edge and to > generate national wealth in all segments of economy. Therefore, the > need of the hour is arm India with technology. Why do certain countries use selective tactics against developing countries?

  1.  To help developing countries gain military and economic independence
  2.  To help developing countries govern themselves and be economically independent
  3.  To ally with developing countries to dominate over other developed countries
  4.  To curtail their domination over developing countries
  5.  None of these

Solution : None of these
Q222. > Though the Cold War has ended, selective tactics are still continuing > for ensuring the military and economic dominance of developed > countries. Various types of technology denial regimes are still being > enforced which are now being mainly targeted against developing > countries like India. Today, we in India encounter twin problems. On > one side there is a large scale strengthening of our neighbours > through supply of arms and clandestine support to their nuclear and > missile programmes and on the other side all efforts are being made to > weaken our indigenous technology growth through control regimes and > dumping of low-tech systems, accompanied with high commercial pitch in > critical areas. Growth of indigenoustechnology and self-reliance are > the only answer to the problem. Thus in the environment around India, > the number of missiles and nuclear powers are continuously increasing > and destructive weapons continue to pile up around us, in spite of > arms reduction treaties. To understand the implications of various > types of warfare that may affect us, we need to take a quick look at > the evolution of war weaponry and the types of warfare. I am > highlighting this point for the reason that in less than a century we > could see change in the nature of warfare and its effects on society. > In early years of human history it was mostly direct human warfare. > During the twentieth century up to about 1990, the warfare was weapon > driven. The weapons used were guns, tanks, aircraft, ships, submarines > and the nuclear weapons deployed on land/sea/air and also > reconnaissance spacecraft. Proliferation of conventional nuclear and > biological weapons was at a peak owing to the competition between the > superpowers. The next phase, in a new form, has just started from 1990 > onwards. The world has graduated into economic warfare. The means used > is control of market forces through high technology. The participating > nations, apart from the USA, are Japan, the UK, France, Germany, > certain South-East Asia countries and a few others. The driving force > is the generation of wealth with certain types of economic doctrine. > The urgent issue we need to address collectively as a nation is, how > do we handle the tactics of economic and military dominance in this > new form coming from the backdoor? Today technology is the main driver > of economic development at the national level. Therefore, we have to > develop indigenous technologies to enhance our competitive edge and to > generate national wealth in all segments of economy. Therefore, the > need of the hour is arm India with technology. Which are the issues of great concern that India is facing at present, according to the author of the passage? (A) The supply of high-tech weaponry by other countries to India’s neighbours who are likely to use the same against India. (B) Other countries secretly helping India’s neighbours to strengthen their nuclear might. (C) Obstruction of India’s genuine efforts to develop its own nuclear technology.

  1.  (A) & (B) only
  2.  (B) & (C) only
  3.  (A) & (C) only
  4.  All (A), (B) & (C)
  5.  None of these

Solution : All (A), (B) & (C)

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Q223. > Though the Cold War has ended, selective tactics are still continuing > for ensuring the military and economic dominance of developed > countries. Various types of technology denial regimes are still being > enforced which are now being mainly targeted against developing > countries like India. Today, we in India encounter twin problems. On > one side there is a large scale strengthening of our neighbours > through supply of arms and clandestine support to their nuclear and > missile programmes and on the other side all efforts are being made to > weaken our indigenous technology growth through control regimes and > dumping of low-tech systems, accompanied with high commercial pitch in > critical areas. Growth of indigenoustechnology and self-reliance are > the only answer to the problem. Thus in the environment around India, > the number of missiles and nuclear powers are continuously increasing > and destructive weapons continue to pile up around us, in spite of > arms reduction treaties. To understand the implications of various > types of warfare that may affect us, we need to take a quick look at > the evolution of war weaponry and the types of warfare. I am > highlighting this point for the reason that in less than a century we > could see change in the nature of warfare and its effects on society. > In early years of human history it was mostly direct human warfare. > During the twentieth century up to about 1990, the warfare was weapon > driven. The weapons used were guns, tanks, aircraft, ships, submarines > and the nuclear weapons deployed on land/sea/air and also > reconnaissance spacecraft. Proliferation of conventional nuclear and > biological weapons was at a peak owing to the competition between the > superpowers. The next phase, in a new form, has just started from 1990 > onwards. The world has graduated into economic warfare. The means used > is control of market forces through high technology. The participating > nations, apart from the USA, are Japan, the UK, France, Germany, > certain South-East Asia countries and a few others. The driving force > is the generation of wealth with certain types of economic doctrine. > The urgent issue we need to address collectively as a nation is, how > do we handle the tactics of economic and military dominance in this > new form coming from the backdoor? Today technology is the main driver > of economic development at the national level. Therefore, we have to > develop indigenous technologies to enhance our competitive edge and to > generate national wealth in all segments of economy. Therefore, the > need of the hour is arm India with technology. Enforcement of technology denial regimes by developed countries implies which of the following?

  1.  Dominance of developing countries over developed one
  2.  Exploitation of developing nations by the mightier ones
  3.  Targeting of developed countries by developing countries
  4.  Sympathizing with underprivileged countries
  5.  None of these

Solution : Exploitation of developing nations by the mightier ones
Q224. > Though the Cold War has ended, selective tactics are still continuing > for ensuring the military and economic dominance of developed > countries. Various types of technology denial regimes are still being > enforced which are now being mainly targeted against developing > countries like India. Today, we in India encounter twin problems. On > one side there is a large scale strengthening of our neighbours > through supply of arms and clandestine support to their nuclear and > missile programmes and on the other side all efforts are being made to > weaken our indigenous technology growth through control regimes and > dumping of low-tech systems, accompanied with high commercial pitch in > critical areas. Growth of indigenoustechnology and self-reliance are > the only answer to the problem. Thus in the environment around India, > the number of missiles and nuclear powers are continuously increasing > and destructive weapons continue to pile up around us, in spite of > arms reduction treaties. To understand the implications of various > types of warfare that may affect us, we need to take a quick look at > the evolution of war weaponry and the types of warfare. I am > highlighting this point for the reason that in less than a century we > could see change in the nature of warfare and its effects on society. > In early years of human history it was mostly direct human warfare. > During the twentieth century up to about 1990, the warfare was weapon > driven. The weapons used were guns, tanks, aircraft, ships, submarines > and the nuclear weapons deployed on land/sea/air and also > reconnaissance spacecraft. Proliferation of conventional nuclear and > biological weapons was at a peak owing to the competition between the > superpowers. The next phase, in a new form, has just started from 1990 > onwards. The world has graduated into economic warfare. The means used > is control of market forces through high technology. The participating > nations, apart from the USA, are Japan, the UK, France, Germany, > certain South-East Asia countries and a few others. The driving force > is the generation of wealth with certain types of economic doctrine. > The urgent issue we need to address collectively as a nation is, how > do we handle the tactics of economic and military dominance in this > new form coming from the backdoor? Today technology is the main driver > of economic development at the national level. Therefore, we have to > develop indigenous technologies to enhance our competitive edge and to > generate national wealth in all segments of economy. Therefore, the > need of the hour is arm India with technology. The striking difference in warfare before and after 1990 was the shift from

  1.  guns, tanks, etc. to nuclear weapons
  2.  ships and submarines to spacecrafts
  3.  weaponry to economic warfare
  4.  economic forces to high technology driven warfare
  5.  None of these

Solution : None of these

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Q225. > Though the Cold War has ended, selective tactics are still continuing > for ensuring the military and economic dominance of developed > countries. Various types of technology denial regimes are still being > enforced which are now being mainly targeted against developing > countries like India. Today, we in India encounter twin problems. On > one side there is a large scale strengthening of our neighbours > through supply of arms and clandestine support to their nuclear and > missile programmes and on the other side all efforts are being made to > weaken our indigenous technology growth through control regimes and > dumping of low-tech systems, accompanied with high commercial pitch in > critical areas. Growth of indigenoustechnology and self-reliance are > the only answer to the problem. Thus in the environment around India, > the number of missiles and nuclear powers are continuously increasing > and destructive weapons continue to pile up around us, in spite of > arms reduction treaties. To understand the implications of various > types of warfare that may affect us, we need to take a quick look at > the evolution of war weaponry and the types of warfare. I am > highlighting this point for the reason that in less than a century we > could see change in the nature of warfare and its effects on society. > In early years of human history it was mostly direct human warfare. > During the twentieth century up to about 1990, the warfare was weapon > driven. The weapons used were guns, tanks, aircraft, ships, submarines > and the nuclear weapons deployed on land/sea/air and also > reconnaissance spacecraft. Proliferation of conventional nuclear and > biological weapons was at a peak owing to the competition between the > superpowers. The next phase, in a new form, has just started from 1990 > onwards. The world has graduated into economic warfare. The means used > is control of market forces through high technology. The participating > nations, apart from the USA, are Japan, the UK, France, Germany, > certain South-East Asia countries and a few others. The driving force > is the generation of wealth with certain types of economic doctrine. > The urgent issue we need to address collectively as a nation is, how > do we handle the tactics of economic and military dominance in this > new form coming from the backdoor? Today technology is the main driver > of economic development at the national level. Therefore, we have to > develop indigenous technologies to enhance our competitive edge and to > generate national wealth in all segments of economy. Therefore, the > need of the hour is arm India with technology.

  1.  All (A), (B) and (C)
  2.  (A) & (B) only
  3.  (A) & (C) only
  4.  (B) & (C) only
  5.  None of these

Solution : All (A), (B) and (C)
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  1.  

Solution :

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