reading-comprehension

Reading Comprehension

Reading Comprehension: English Reading Comprehension Exercises with Answers, Sample Passages for Reading Comprehension Test for GRE, CAT, IELTS preparation

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English Reading Comprehension Test Questions and Answers. Improve your ability to read and comprehend English Passages

Q31. > Online shopping is the process of researching and purchasing products > or services over the Internet. Basically online shopping is divided > into 2 categories: Travel/Tourism and Online Retail Business. > Travel/Tourism websites are like Makemytrip.com, IRCTC.com, > Bookmyshow.com, Paytm.com and Yatra.com. These all sites provide some > kind of either tickets or service. Like Paytm.com helps to do online > recharge while makemytrip.com helps us to make Air/Bus/Rail ticket. > > > Online Retail Websites are those, from where we purchase a product and > the product is delivered to our doorstep. Like Flipkart.com, eBay.com > and Amazon. in. These websites have a wide range of variety of > products and brand. They deliver the purchased goods to our doorstep. > Online Ticketing/Tourism/Services contribute 75% to the total revenue. > The earliest online stores went into business in 1992, and online > retailing took over a significant segment of the retail market during > the first decade of the twenty-first century, as ownership of personal > computers increased and established retailers began to offer their > products over the Internet. > > Despite spiraling inflation and decline in demand for goods and > services, e-commerce continued to gather steam in the year 2013. It > moved strongly ahead, finding great acceptance among consumers as they > turned to online portals for buying electronics, home appliances, > fast-moving consumer goods and even cars. The year 2014 will see > continuation of consolidation of business in the over-crowded > industry, and experts expect clear leaders to emerge in terms of > specific categories. Reasons behind the popularity of Online Shopping > in India are following: Internet users are increasing at a rate of > 20%. Some specific product may not be available in local market. In > online shopping website, we can find a wide range of variety and > brands. So we can choose the best and cheaper among all. We get > discount and other incentives through online shopping, which is > generally not available in retail shop. Like Flipkart.com provides 30 > days replacement guarantee. Moreover we have a busy life schedule, to > book a Railway ticket at Ticket Counter may consume entire day but we > can book the same ticket online within two minutes (considering > makemytrip.com). So we can save our time through online shopping. We > have also multiple payment options. So no tension of cash. In case of > online shopping we get cash on delivery, some times free home delivery > and many other incentives, which are very attractive. > > The growth rate of Online Shopping is gaining pace in India. India is > 3rd largest country in this race lagging behind only USA and China. > The growth rate of Online Shoppers is more than 30% while world’s > average growth rate is just 6-7%. You may be wondered to see that only > 11% of India population is using Internet and only 10 million online > shoppers. Think about the number of online shoppers, if 50% of India’s > population gets start online shopping. The revenue generation was > $2.5b in 2009, $6.3b in 2011 and $14b in 2012 and it is expected to > reach to $24b by 2015. It is expected to contribute 4% to our GDP by > 2020.Consumers across the globe are increasingly swapping crowded stores for one-click convenience, as online shopping becomes a safe > and popular option. Online shopping has some advantages over shopping > in retail stores, including the ability to easily compare prices from > a range of merchants, access to a wide selection of merchandise, being > open 24*7 and the convenience of not having to drive to a physical > store. The Future growth will come through improvements to the > shopping process on existing Websites; the implementation of more > online shopping sites by existing retailers; the coming of age of a > younger, more technology-oriented generation; and the introduction of > novel goods, services and online shopping experiences. The growth of > online shopping in developing nations like India will occur as more > people acquire personal computers and credit cards. Why do people prefer online shopping?

  1.  Easy access to variety of brands with multiple payment options.
  2.  Today's generation is technology oriented
  3.  Most of the people have their own personal computers and credit cards
  4.  Online shopping allows discounts and other lucrative offers.
  5.  None of these

Solution : Easy access to variety of brands with multiple payment options.
Q32. > India is a great book producing nation and has a vibrant world of book > publishing spread throughout the vast country in a number of modern > languages most of which have their roots in Sanskrit, the mother of > Indian languages. In terms of numbers, there are more than 16,000 > publishers in India publishing 90,000 titles annually in 24 languages, > out of which 18 are highly developed, to fulfill the needs of this > multilingual nation. These languages have a galaxy of good authors, > their own publishers and readers of books within their own area as > well as spread out in the entire country. Today Indian publishing is > one of the greatest in the world and can be counted among the first > seven publishing nations. > > We are the third largest publishers of English language Books after > the US and UK. India is the third biggest market for English > publications with almost 12,000 publishers that publish around 90,000 > titles a year in more than 18 languages. India’s main publishing is in > the Indian languages. In India, every year a world level Book fair is > held in New Delhi, which is India’s oldest book fair. Delhi Book Fair > is playing a pivotal role in reiterating the might of the pen and the > printed word and has come to be recognized as the biggest annual > cultural event and book bonanza keenly awaited by students, teachers, > scholars, authors, intellectuals, librarians and book lovers. First > New Delhi World Book Fair was held in around 6790 sq meter area with > 200 participants from March 18 to April 4, 1972. It was inaugurated by > Sh VV Giri President of India. This biennial event takes place in > early February, and is organised by the National Book Trust, India > (NBT). Delhi Book Fair has evolved over the years as a highly popular > conduit to the world of books and publishers and distributors. The > ever increasing numbers of visitors and exhibitors speaks volumes of > its success. The fair provides a unique platform for > business-to-business transactions, establishing new contacts, entering > into co-publishing arrangements, translation and copyright > arrangements, reprinting of old and rare books. The visitor profile at > the fair includes national and International publishers, librarians, > researchers, academicians, writers, students and book lovers. > Publishers also introduced “e-Books” in this fair. The focus is being > given especially keeping in mind the increasing number of IT-savvy > younger generation with a penchant for internet, mobile phones and > other reader-friendly digital gizmos. > > E-books and e-publishing both have their obvious advantages though > authors in India have only just begun to realise the immense benefits > digital technology can be of in this field. Also, with the country > being the third biggest publisher — after the US and UK — the > potential in this field is immense and the response too has been quite > encouraging so far with a lot of publishers already showing interest > in e-publishing. E-publishing is a boon for both established and > wannabe writers as it is cost effective and cuts down the time it take > for a book to reach markets to about a fourth of what it would have > taken had it been left to publishers to do the job. Other benefits > include authors now have a world wide audience to their book which > means better business while debugging or carrying out revisions too is > a lot less hazardous. Another interesting development to have occurred > in recent times is the launch of Amazon e-book store in the country as > well as the availability of the Kindle range of e-book readers. > Needless to say, a direct fallout of the renewed push that e-book are > getting is increased sale of e-book readers and tablet devices. Which of the following is not a feature of Delhi Book fair ?

  1.  Business to business transactions
  2.  Co-publishing arrangements
  3.  Availability of rare books
  4.  E - Books
  5.  None of these

Solution : None of these

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Q33. > India is a great book producing nation and has a vibrant world of > book publishing spread throughout the vast country in a number of > modern languages most of which have their roots in Sanskrit, the > mother of Indian languages. In terms of numbers, there are more than > 16,000 publishers in India publishing 90,000 titles annually in 24 > languages, out of which 18 are highly developed, to fulfill the needs > of this multilingual nation. These languages have a galaxy of good > authors, their own publishers and readers of books within their own > area as well as spread out in the entire country. Today Indian > publishing is one of the greatest in the world and can be counted > among the first seven publishing nations. > > We are the third largest publishers of English language Books after > the US and UK. India is the third biggest market for English > publications with almost 12,000 publishers that publish around 90,000 > titles a year in more than 18 languages. India’s main publishing is in > the Indian languages. In India, every year a world level Book fair is > held in New Delhi, which is India’s oldest book fair. Delhi Book Fair > is playing a pivotal role in reiterating the might of the pen and the > printed word and has come to be recognized as the biggest annual > cultural event and book bonanza keenly awaited by students, teachers, > scholars, authors, intellectuals, librarians and book lovers. First > New Delhi World Book Fair was held in around 6790 sq meter area with > 200 participants from March 18 to April 4, 1972. It was inaugurated by > Sh VV Giri President of India. This biennial event takes place in > early February, and is organised by the National Book Trust, India > (NBT). Delhi Book Fair has evolved over the years as a highly popular > conduit to the world of books and publishers and distributors. The > ever increasing numbers of visitors and exhibitors speaks volumes of > its success. The fair provides a unique platform for > business-to-business transactions, establishing new contacts, entering > into co-publishing arrangements, translation and copyright > arrangements, reprinting of old and rare books. The visitor profile at > the fair includes national and International publishers, librarians, > researchers, academicians, writers, students and book lovers. > Publishers also introduced “e-Books” in this fair. The focus is being > given especially keeping in mind the increasing number of IT-savvy > younger generation with a penchant for internet, mobile phones and > other reader-friendly digital gizmos. > > E-books and e-publishing both have their obvious advantages though > authors in India have only just begun to realise the immense benefits > digital technology can be of in this field. Also, with the country > being the third biggest publisher — after the US and UK — the > potential in this field is immense and the response too has been quite > encouraging so far with a lot of publishers already showing interest > in e-publishing. E-publishing is a boon for both established and > wannabe writers as it is cost effective and cuts down the time it take > for a book to reach markets to about a fourth of what it would have > taken had it been left to publishers to do the job. Other benefits > include authors now have a world wide audience to their book which > means better business while debugging or carrying out revisions too is > a lot less hazardous. Another interesting development to have occurred > in recent times is the launch of Amazon e-book store in the country as > well as the availability of the Kindle range of e-book readers. > Needless to say, a direct fallout of the renewed push that e-book are > getting is increased sale of e-book readers and tablet devices. Which of the following is false in the context of given passage ?

  1.  People have only craze of variety of books in the fair and not for offer and cash cow.
  2.  New Delhi book fair has completed more than 40 years of its success.
  3.  After the US and the UK, India has maintained its place in the list of largest publishers of English language books.
  4.  All of the above
  5.  None of the above

Solution : People have only craze of variety of books in the fair and not for offer and cash cow.
Q34. > Imagine yourself in an Indian city where every home is connected to > internet, gas, water and electricity via a smart grid. All citizens > are linked to each other and to civic facilities in real time. The > city uses renewable energy and its transport systems are controlled > via central command centres to reduce traffic and pollution. In this > city, there are no offensive smells, no noise, no dust, no heaving > crowds. It is a smart city, the ideal city. And it exists: on paper. > Its name is Dholera, and it is a key part of what you might call > India’s 21st-century utopian urban experiment. Economists argue that > the country desperately needs new cities: its urban population is > expected to rise from 28% in 2001 to almost 36% in 2026, bringing the > total number of people living in its cities and urban regions to 590 > million. > > To accommodate this growth, suggests a McKinsey report, India will > need 20 to 30 new cities in the next decade alone. The state’s > solution has been to push for 24 new “smart cities” along high-speed > regional transport networks. Dholera is one of these. At 903 sq km, it > would be twice the size of Mumbai. It is planned in the “influence > zone” of a mega-infrastructure project, the Delhi-Mumbai industrial > corridor, which will link India’s political capital Delhi with its > economic capital Mumbai, and therefore, so the thinking goes, spur > economic growth in the region. The Dholera that actually exists, > however, is something else entirely. A casual visitor might see the > small sign along the highway pointing in the direction of Dholera. But > they might also, if they take the turn-off, be disappointed: for > several months of the year, they will find a vast, low-lying area, > mostly submerged under seawater. The rest of the year, they will see > the classic cracked-earth look of salt flats. Dotting this landscape > are farm buildings, village huts and small reservoirs storing > rainwater that is used to irrigate fields of cumin, millet, wheat and > cotton. They will see a vast landscape with about 40,000 people living > in an ecological region that loses 1cm of its coastline to the sea > every day. They might then understand that Dholera is not yet a > “place”: it is still a terrain of possibilities. > > P M Modi has declared Dholera and other proposed smart cities in the > region to be “building blocks of a global Gujarat”, envisioned on the > lines of Shanghai. And to make sure it happens, he shepherded in a new > Special Investment Region (SIR) Act in March 2009. The act gives more > power to the state to acquire land for building smart cities like > Dholera. Another scenario is that Dholera is significantly downsized > due to a lack of investors and stripped of its “smart” credentials, to > become just another industrial township along the Delhi-Mumbai > corridor. It becomes one of those backdoor cities to India’s > urbanisation and economic growth, where polluting industries are > located to keep them away from Delhi and Mumbai. It remains, in other > words, a far cry from the smart city presented in the glossy marketing > images. Which of the following is the cause of planned discontinuation of smart city Project? Reply on the basis of the given passage.

  1.  SEZ rules of Government of India.
  2.  Because the government of India had gone bust due to the global recession.
  3.  The master plan is not successful
  4.  Due to paucity of investors and accreditation.
  5.  All of the above

Solution : Due to paucity of investors and accreditation.

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Q35. > Imagine yourself in an Indian city where every home is connected to > internet, gas, water and electricity via a smart grid. All citizens > are linked to each other and to civic facilities in real time. The > city uses renewable energy and its transport systems are controlled > via central command centres to reduce traffic and pollution. In this > city, there are no offensive smells, no noise, no dust, no heaving > crowds. It is a smart city, the ideal city. And it exists: on paper. > Its name is Dholera, and it is a key part of what you might call > India’s 21st-century utopian urban experiment. Economists argue that > the country desperately needs new cities: its urban population is > expected to rise from 28% in 2001 to almost 36% in 2026, bringing the > total number of people living in its cities and urban regions to 590 > million. > > To accommodate this growth, suggests a McKinsey report, India will > need 20 to 30 new cities in the next decade alone. The state’s > solution has been to push for 24 new “smart cities” along high-speed > regional transport networks. Dholera is one of these. At 903 sq km, it > would be twice the size of Mumbai. It is planned in the “influence > zone” of a mega-infrastructure project, the Delhi-Mumbai industrial > corridor, which will link India’s political capital Delhi with its > economic capital Mumbai, and therefore, so the thinking goes, spur > economic growth in the region. The Dholera that actually exists, > however, is something else entirely. A casual visitor might see the > small sign along the highway pointing in the direction of Dholera. But > they might also, if they take the turn-off, be disappointed: for > several months of the year, they will find a vast, low-lying area, > mostly submerged under seawater. The rest of the year, they will see > the classic cracked-earth look of salt flats. Dotting this landscape > are farm buildings, village huts and small reservoirs storing > rainwater that is used to irrigate fields of cumin, millet, wheat and > cotton. They will see a vast landscape with about 40,000 people living > in an ecological region that loses 1cm of its coastline to the sea > every day. They might then understand that Dholera is not yet a > “place”: it is still a terrain of possibilities. > > P M Modi has declared Dholera and other proposed smart cities in the > region to be “building blocks of a global Gujarat”, envisioned on the > lines of Shanghai. And to make sure it happens, he shepherded in a new > Special Investment Region (SIR) Act in March 2009. The act gives more > power to the state to acquire land for building smart cities like > Dholera. Another scenario is that Dholera is significantly downsized > due to a lack of investors and stripped of its “smart” credentials, to > become just another industrial township along the Delhi-Mumbai > corridor. It becomes one of those backdoor cities to India’s > urbanisation and economic growth, where polluting industries are > located to keep them away from Delhi and Mumbai. It remains, in other > words, a far cry from the smart city presented in the glossy marketing > images. Which of the following is definitely true with respect to smart city

  1.  Government of India has envisioned the concept of building 100 new smart cities in the country.
  2.  Government looks forward to the smart cities that will have better facilities, better connectivity and better environment.
  3.  India will be the 'first smart nation' of the world.
  4.  All of the above
  5.  None of these

Solution : Government looks forward to the smart cities that will have better facilities, better connectivity and better environment.
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Solution :

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