reading-comprehension

Reading Comprehension

Reading Comprehension: English Reading Comprehension Exercises with Answers, Sample Passages for Reading Comprehension Test for GRE, CAT, IELTS preparation

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English Reading Comprehension Test Questions and Answers. Improve your ability to read and comprehend English Passages

Q351. > Economist, ethicists and business experts persuade us that honesty is > the best policy, but their evidence is weak. We hoped to find data > that would support their theories and thus, perhaps, encourage higher > standards of business behaviour. To our surprise, their pet theories > failed to stand up. Treachery, we found, can pay. There is no > compelling economic reason to tell the truth or keep one’s word. > Punishment for the treacherous in the real world is neither swift nor > sure. > > > Honesty is, in fact, primarily a moral choice. Business people do > tell themselves that, in the long run, they will do well by doing > good. But there is little factual or logical basis for this > conviction. Without values, without a basic preference of right over > wrong, trust based on such delusion would crumble in the face of > temptation. Most of us choose virtue because we want to believe in > ourselves and because others respect and believe us. > And due to this, we should be happy. We can be proud of a system in which people are honest because they want to be, not because they > have to be. Materially, too, trust based on morality provides great > advantages. It allows us to join in great and exciting enterprises > that we could never undertake if we relied on economic incentives > alone. > Economists tell us that trust is enforced in the market place through retaliation and reputation. If you violate a trust, your > victim is apt to seek revenge and others are likely to stop doing > business with you, at least under favourable terms. A man or woman > with a reputation for fair dealing will prosper. Therefore, profit > maximisers are honest. This sounds plausible enough until you look for > concrete examples. Cases that apparently demonstrate the awful > consequences of trust turn out to be few and weak, while evidence that > treachery can pay seems compelling. Why are businessmen, according to the author, honest in their dealings?

  1.  Businessmen are God-fearing
  2.  Businessmen choose to be honest
  3.  Businessmen are honest by nature
  4.  All businessmen are caught if they are dishonest
  5.  Businessmen are careless

Solution : Businessmen choose to be honest
Q352. > Economist, ethicists and business experts persuade us that honesty is > the best policy, but their evidence is weak. We hoped to find data > that would support their theories and thus, perhaps, encourage higher > standards of business behaviour. To our surprise, their pet theories > failed to stand up. Treachery, we found, can pay. There is no > compelling economic reason to tell the truth or keep one’s word. > Punishment for the treacherous in the real world is neither swift nor > sure. > Honesty is, in fact, primarily a moral choice. Business people do tell themselves that, in the long run, they will do well by doing > good. But there is little factual or logical basis for this > conviction. Without values, without a basic preference of right over > wrong, trust based on such delusion would crumble in the face of > temptation. Most of us choose virtue because we want to believe in > ourselves and because others respect and believe us. > And due to this, we should be happy. We can be proud of a system in which people are honest because they want to be, not because they > have to be. Materially, too, trust based on morality provides great > advantages. It allows us to join in great and exciting enterprises > that we could never undertake if we relied on economic incentives > alone. > Economists tell us that trust is enforced in the market place through retaliation and reputation. If you violate a trust, your > victim is apt to seek revenge and others are likely to stop doing > business with you, at least under favourable terms. A man or woman > with a reputation for fair dealing will prosper. Therefore, profit > maximisers are honest. This sounds plausible enough until you look for > concrete examples. Cases that apparently demonstrate the awful > consequences of trust turn out to be few and weak, while evidence that > treachery can pay seems compelling. According to the author, which of the following, is the reason for being honest in business?

  1.  It gives no immediate benefits
  2.  It gives no long-term benefits
  3.  It makes a person self-seeking
  4.  It is harmful for competitors in long run
  5.  None of the above

Solution : None of the above

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Q353. > Economist, ethicists and business experts persuade us that honesty is > the best policy, but their evidence is weak. We hoped to find data > that would support their theories and thus, perhaps, encourage higher > standards of business behaviour. To our surprise, their pet theories > failed to stand up. Treachery, we found, can pay. There is no > compelling economic reason to tell the truth or keep one’s word. > Punishment for the treacherous in the real world is neither swift nor > sure. > Honesty is, in fact, primarily a moral choice. Business people do tell themselves that, in the long run, they will do well by doing > good. But there is little factual or logical basis for this > conviction. Without values, without a basic preference of right over > wrong, trust based on such delusion would crumble in the face of > temptation. Most of us choose virtue because we want to believe in > ourselves and because others respect and believe us. > And due to this, we should be happy. We can be proud of a system in which people are honest because they want to be, not because they > have to be. Materially, too, trust based on morality provides great > advantages. It allows us to join in great and exciting enterprises > that we could never undertake if we relied on economic incentives > alone. > Economists tell us that trust is enforced in the market place through retaliation and reputation. If you violate a trust, your > victim is apt to seek revenge and others are likely to stop doing > business with you, at least under favourable terms. A man or woman > with a reputation for fair dealing will prosper. Therefore, profit > maximisers are honest. This sounds plausible enough until you look for > concrete examples. Cases that apparently demonstrate the awful > consequences of trust turn out to be few and weak, while evidence that > treachery can pay seems compelling. Why does the author say that one can be proud of the present situation?

  1.  People are self-respecting
  2.  People are respect seekers
  3.  People are unselfish
  4.  People are honest without compulsion
  5.  People are sensitive towards market

Solution : People are honest without compulsion
Q354. > Economist, ethicists and business experts persuade us that honesty is > the best policy, but their evidence is weak. We hoped to find data > that would support their theories and thus, perhaps, encourage higher > standards of business behaviour. To our surprise, their pet theories > failed to stand up. Treachery, we found, can pay. There is no > compelling economic reason to tell the truth or keep one’s word. > Punishment for the treacherous in the real world is neither swift nor > sure. > Honesty is, in fact, primarily a moral choice. Business people do tell themselves that, in the long run, they will do well by doing > good. But there is little factual or logical basis for this > conviction. Without values, without a basic preference of right over > wrong, trust based on such delusion would crumble in the face of > temptation. Most of us choose virtue because we want to believe in > ourselves and because others respect and believe us. > And due to this, we should be happy. We can be proud of a system in which people are honest because they want to be, not because they > have to be. Materially, too, trust based on morality provides great > advantages. It allows us to join in great and exciting enterprises > that we could never undertake if we relied on economic incentives > alone. > Economists tell us that trust is enforced in the market place through retaliation and reputation. If you violate a trust, your > victim is apt to seek revenge and others are likely to stop doing > business with you, at least under favourable terms. A man or woman > with a reputation for fair dealing will prosper. Therefore, profit > maximisers are honest. This sounds plausible enough until you look for > concrete examples. Cases that apparently demonstrate the awful > consequences of trust turn out to be few and weak, while evidence that > treachery can pay seems compelling. What is the material advantage which the author sees is being honest?

  1.  It permits one to undertake activities which may not be economically attractive
  2.  It permits one to be honest for the sake of honesty alone
  3.  It permits one to be make a lot of profit in various areas
  4.  It permits one to form various trusts to make profits
  5.  It permits one to gain value in personal life

Solution : It permits one to be make a lot of profit in various areas

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Q355. > Economist, ethicists and business experts persuade us that honesty is > the best policy, but their evidence is weak. We hoped to find data > that would support their theories and thus, perhaps, encourage higher > standards of business behaviour. To our surprise, their pet theories > failed to stand up. Treachery, we found, can pay. There is no > compelling economic reason to tell the truth or keep one’s word. > Punishment for the treacherous in the real world is neither swift nor > sure. > Honesty is, in fact, primarily a moral choice. Business people do tell themselves that, in the long run, they will do well by doing > good. But there is little factual or logical basis for this > conviction. Without values, without a basic preference of right over > wrong, trust based on such delusion would crumble in the face of > temptation. Most of us choose virtue because we want to believe in > ourselves and because others respect and believe us. > And due to this, we should be happy. We can be proud of a system in which people are honest because they want to be, not because they > have to be. Materially, too, trust based on morality provides great > advantages. It allows us to join in great and exciting enterprises > that we could never undertake if we relied on economic incentives > alone. > Economists tell us that trust is enforced in the market place through retaliation and reputation. If you violate a trust, your > victim is apt to seek revenge and others are likely to stop doing > business with you, at least under favourable terms. A man or woman > with a reputation for fair dealing will prosper. Therefore, profit > maximisers are honest. This sounds plausible enough until you look for > concrete examples. Cases that apparently demonstrate the awful > consequences of trust turn out to be few and weak, while evidence that > treachery can pay seems compelling. Why do businessmen, according to economists, remain honest?

  1.  Dishonest businessmen can make more money
  2.  Dishonest businessmen make money in the long run
  3.  Dishonest businessmen cannot stay in business for long
  4.  Dishonest businessmen are flogged in the market place
  5.  Dishonest businessmen have the decisive power in the market

Solution : Dishonest businessmen cannot stay in business for long
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