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Reading Comprehension

Reading Comprehension: English Reading Comprehension Exercises with Answers, Sample Passages for Reading Comprehension Test for GRE, CAT, IELTS preparation

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English Reading Comprehension Test Questions and Answers. Improve your ability to read and comprehend English Passages

Q371. > The happy man is the man who lived objectively, who has free affection > and wide interest, who secures his happiness through these interests > and affections and through the fact that they, in turn, make him an > object of interest and affection to many others. To be the recipient > of affection is a potent cause of happiness, but the man who demands > affection is not the man upon whom it is bestowed. The man who > receives affection is, speaking broadly, the man who gives it. But it > useless to attempt to give it as a calculation, in the way in which > one might lend money at interest, for a calculated affection is not > genuine and is not felt to be so by the recipient. What then can a man > do who is unhappy because he is encased in self? So long as he > continues to think about the cause of his unhappiness, he continues to > be self-centred and therefore does not get outside, the vicious circle > if he is to get outside it, it must be by genuine interests, not by > simulated interest accepted merely as a medicine. Although this > difficulty is real, there is nevertheless much that he can do if he > has rightly diagnosed his trouble. If, for example, his trouble is due > to a sense of sin, conscious or unconscious he can first persuade his > conscious mind that he has no reason to feel sinful, and then proceed, > to plant his rational conviction in his unconscious mind, concerning > himself meanwhile with some more or less neutral activity. If he > succeeds in dispelling the sense of sin, it is possible that genuine > objective interests will arise spontaneously. If his trouble is > self-pity, he can deal with it in the same manner after first > persuading himself that there is nothing extraordinarily unfortunate > in his circumstances. If fear is his trouble, let him practice > exercises designed to give courage. Courage has been recognised from > time immemorial as an important virtue, and a great part of training > of boys and young men has been devoted to producing a type of > character capable of fearlessness in battle. But moral courage and > intellectual courage have been much less studied, they also, however, > have their technique, admit to yourself every day at least one painful > truth, your will find his quite useful. Teach yourself to feel that > life still be worth living even if you were not, as of course you are > immeasurably superior to all your friends in virtue and in > intelligence. Exercises of this sort prolonged through several years > will at last enable you to admit facts without flinching and will, in > so doing, free you from the empire of feat over a very large filed. What should a man do who is suffering from the feeling of self-pity?

  1.  He should control his passions and emotions
  2.  He should persuade himself that everything is alright in his circumstances
  3.  He should seek affection from others
  4.  He should develop a feeling of fearlessness
  5.  He should consult an expert to diagnose his trouble

Solution : He should persuade himself that everything is alright in his circumstances
Q372. > The happy man is the man who lived objectively, who has free affection > and wide interest, who secures his happiness through these interests > and affections and through the fact that they, in turn, make him an > object of interest and affection to many others. To be the recipient > of affection is a potent cause of happiness, but the man who demands > affection is not the man upon whom it is bestowed. The man who > receives affection is, speaking broadly, the man who gives it. But it > useless to attempt to give it as a calculation, in the way in which > one might lend money at interest, for a calculated affection is not > genuine and is not felt to be so by the recipient. What then can a man > do who is unhappy because he is encased in self? So long as he > continues to think about the cause of his unhappiness, he continues to > be self-centred and therefore does not get outside, the vicious circle > if he is to get outside it, it must be by genuine interests, not by > simulated interest accepted merely as a medicine. Although this > difficulty is real, there is nevertheless much that he can do if he > has rightly diagnosed his trouble. If, for example, his trouble is due > to a sense of sin, conscious or unconscious he can first persuade his > conscious mind that he has no reason to feel sinful, and then proceed, > to plant his rational conviction in his unconscious mind, concerning > himself meanwhile with some more or less neutral activity. If he > succeeds in dispelling the sense of sin, it is possible that genuine > objective interests will arise spontaneously. If his trouble is > self-pity, he can deal with it in the same manner after first > persuading himself that there is nothing extraordinarily unfortunate > in his circumstances. If fear is his trouble, let him practice > exercises designed to give courage. Courage has been recognised from > time immemorial as an important virtue, and a great part of training > of boys and young men has been devoted to producing a type of > character capable of fearlessness in battle. But moral courage and > intellectual courage have been much less studied, they also, however, > have their technique, admit to yourself every day at least one painful > truth, your will find his quite useful. Teach yourself to feel that > life still be worth living even if you were not, as of course you are > immeasurably superior to all your friends in virtue and in > intelligence. Exercises of this sort prolonged through several years > will at last enable you to admit facts without flinching and will, in > so doing, free you from the empire of feat over a very large filed. Which of the following, according to the passage, has not been studied much?

  1.  Feeling of guilt and self-pity
  2.  The state of mind of a unhappy man
  3.  How to get absorbed in other interests
  4.  Moral and intellectual courage
  5.  None of these

Solution : Moral and intellectual courage

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Q373. > The happy man is the man who lived objectively, who has free affection > and wide interest, who secures his happiness through these interests > and affections and through the fact that they, in turn, make him an > object of interest and affection to many others. To be the recipient > of affection is a potent cause of happiness, but the man who demands > affection is not the man upon whom it is bestowed. The man who > receives affection is, speaking broadly, the man who gives it. But it > useless to attempt to give it as a calculation, in the way in which > one might lend money at interest, for a calculated affection is not > genuine and is not felt to be so by the recipient. What then can a man > do who is unhappy because he is encased in self? So long as he > continues to think about the cause of his unhappiness, he continues to > be self-centred and therefore does not get outside, the vicious circle > if he is to get outside it, it must be by genuine interests, not by > simulated interest accepted merely as a medicine. Although this > difficulty is real, there is nevertheless much that he can do if he > has rightly diagnosed his trouble. If, for example, his trouble is due > to a sense of sin, conscious or unconscious he can first persuade his > conscious mind that he has no reason to feel sinful, and then proceed, > to plant his rational conviction in his unconscious mind, concerning > himself meanwhile with some more or less neutral activity. If he > succeeds in dispelling the sense of sin, it is possible that genuine > objective interests will arise spontaneously. If his trouble is > self-pity, he can deal with it in the same manner after first > persuading himself that there is nothing extraordinarily unfortunate > in his circumstances. If fear is his trouble, let him practice > exercises designed to give courage. Courage has been recognised from > time immemorial as an important virtue, and a great part of training > of boys and young men has been devoted to producing a type of > character capable of fearlessness in battle. But moral courage and > intellectual courage have been much less studied, they also, however, > have their technique, admit to yourself every day at least one painful > truth, your will find his quite useful. Teach yourself to feel that > life still be worth living even if you were not, as of course you are > immeasurably superior to all your friends in virtue and in > intelligence. Exercises of this sort prolonged through several years > will at last enable you to admit facts without flinching and will, in > so doing, free you from the empire of feat over a very large filed. Which of the following virtues, according to the passage has been recognised for long as an important virtue?

  1.  Patriotism
  2.  Sacrifice
  3.  Courage
  4.  Self-consciousness
  5.  None of these

Solution : Courage
Q374. > The happy man is the man who lived objectively, who has free affection > and wide interest, who secures his happiness through these interests > and affections and through the fact that they, in turn, make him an > object of interest and affection to many others. To be the recipient > of affection is a potent cause of happiness, but the man who demands > affection is not the man upon whom it is bestowed. The man who > receives affection is, speaking broadly, the man who gives it. But it > useless to attempt to give it as a calculation, in the way in which > one might lend money at interest, for a calculated affection is not > genuine and is not felt to be so by the recipient. What then can a man > do who is unhappy because he is encased in self? So long as he > continues to think about the cause of his unhappiness, he continues to > be self-centred and therefore does not get outside, the vicious circle > if he is to get outside it, it must be by genuine interests, not by > simulated interest accepted merely as a medicine. Although this > difficulty is real, there is nevertheless much that he can do if he > has rightly diagnosed his trouble. If, for example, his trouble is due > to a sense of sin, conscious or unconscious he can first persuade his > conscious mind that he has no reason to feel sinful, and then proceed, > to plant his rational conviction in his unconscious mind, concerning > himself meanwhile with some more or less neutral activity. If he > succeeds in dispelling the sense of sin, it is possible that genuine > objective interests will arise spontaneously. If his trouble is > self-pity, he can deal with it in the same manner after first > persuading himself that there is nothing extraordinarily unfortunate > in his circumstances. If fear is his trouble, let him practice > exercises designed to give courage. Courage has been recognised from > time immemorial as an important virtue, and a great part of training > of boys and young men has been devoted to producing a type of > character capable of fearlessness in battle. But moral courage and > intellectual courage have been much less studied, they also, however, > have their technique, admit to yourself every day at least one painful > truth, your will find his quite useful. Teach yourself to feel that > life still be worth living even if you were not, as of course you are > immeasurably superior to all your friends in virtue and in > intelligence. Exercises of this sort prolonged through several years > will at last enable you to admit facts without flinching and will, in > so doing, free you from the empire of feat over a very large filed. Which of the following statements in NOT TRUE in the context of the passage?

  1.  Happy man has wide interests
  2.  Courage has been recognised as an important virtue
  3.  Unhappy man is encased in self
  4.  A man who suffers from the sense of sin must tell himself that he has no reason to be sinful
  5.  Issue of intellectual courage has been extensively studied

Solution : Issue of intellectual courage has been extensively studied

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Q375. > The happy man is the man who lived objectively, who has free affection > and wide interest, who secures his happiness through these interests > and affections and through the fact that they, in turn, make him an > object of interest and affection to many others. To be the recipient > of affection is a potent cause of happiness, but the man who demands > affection is not the man upon whom it is bestowed. The man who > receives affection is, speaking broadly, the man who gives it. But it > useless to attempt to give it as a calculation, in the way in which > one might lend money at interest, for a calculated affection is not > genuine and is not felt to be so by the recipient. What then can a man > do who is unhappy because he is encased in self? So long as he > continues to think about the cause of his unhappiness, he continues to > be self-centred and therefore does not get outside, the vicious circle > if he is to get outside it, it must be by genuine interests, not by > simulated interest accepted merely as a medicine. Although this > difficulty is real, there is nevertheless much that he can do if he > has rightly diagnosed his trouble. If, for example, his trouble is due > to a sense of sin, conscious or unconscious he can first persuade his > conscious mind that he has no reason to feel sinful, and then proceed, > to plant his rational conviction in his unconscious mind, concerning > himself meanwhile with some more or less neutral activity. If he > succeeds in dispelling the sense of sin, it is possible that genuine > objective interests will arise spontaneously. If his trouble is > self-pity, he can deal with it in the same manner after first > persuading himself that there is nothing extraordinarily unfortunate > in his circumstances. If fear is his trouble, let him practice > exercises designed to give courage. Courage has been recognised from > time immemorial as an important virtue, and a great part of training > of boys and young men has been devoted to producing a type of > character capable of fearlessness in battle. But moral courage and > intellectual courage have been much less studied, they also, however, > have their technique, admit to yourself every day at least one painful > truth, your will find his quite useful. Teach yourself to feel that > life still be worth living even if you were not, as of course you are > immeasurably superior to all your friends in virtue and in > intelligence. Exercises of this sort prolonged through several years > will at last enable you to admit facts without flinching and will, in > so doing, free you from the empire of feat over a very large filed. Who according to the passage is the happy man?

  1.  Who is encased in self
  2.  Who has free affection and wide interests
  3.  Who is free from wordly passions
  4.  Who has extremely centred passions
  5.  None of these

Solution : Who has free affection and wide interests
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