adverbs

Adverbs

Tips and Self-Assessment Quiz On Adverbs

Tips on Adverbs

Tips on answering questions in English grammar related to Adverbs

    1 Tips

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Learning Pundits Content Team

Written on Sep 28, 2017 4:40:28 PM


Grammar Rules with 10 Tips for using Adverbs

Identify the Adverbs:


Alisha left home early for her driving test. She drove nervously to the test center. When the examiner asked her to set off, she drove slowly but steadily down the street. Shortly after she had started, another car came in front of her suddenly. Alisha could not see clearly but she swerved right sharply to avert collision. Her car was badly damaged after hitting the pavement. Fortunately, the examiner appreciated her presence of mind and she passed the test successfully.

Solution:

Alisha left home early for her driving test. She drove nervously to the test center. When the examiner asked her to set off, she drove slowly but steadily down the street. Shortly after she had started, another car came in front of her suddenly. Alisha could not see clearly but she swerved right sharply to avert collision. Her car was badly damaged after hitting the pavement. Fortunately, the examiner appreciated her presence of mind and she passed the test successfully.


What is an Adverb?


An Adverb is a word which modifies the meaning of a Verb, an Adjective or another Adverb.

Note: Adverbs often end with “ly”.

1.    He is a very intelligent boy. ‘Very’ modifies the Adjective ‘intelligent’

2.    She acted remarkably. ‘Remarkably’ modifies the Verb ‘act’

3.    Her act was remarkable. Here ‘remarkable’ is an adjective modifying the noun ‘act’

Adverbs normally answer the following types of questions:

1.    When? She always arrives early.

2.    How? He drives carefully.

3.    Where? They go everywhere together.

4.    In what manner? She eats slowly.

5.    To what extent? It is terribly hot.


[Note: A word that gives more information or modifies the meaning of a verb, an adjective, or another adverb is called an Adverb. Adverbs often end with “-ly” like beautifully, shortly, carefully. But in many cases Adverb resemble very closely with Adjectives in a sentence. So follow the examples carefully.

Remember that words like manly, weekly, monthly end with ‘-ly’ but they are adjectives and not adverbs. Words like fast, hard, straight, late, safe can be used both as adverb and adjective.

But identifying adverbs in a sentence is not very difficult. Normally adverbs answer five types of questions for the existent verb, adjective or adverbs in a sentence: When, How, Where in what manner and to what extent.]




Types of Adverbs:


1. Adverb of Time: describes when or for how long a certain action happened.

Example words: Already, ago, before, yet, never, soon, yesterday, soon, lately.

Example sentences:

I have heard this before.

I have not seen him since.

2. Adverb of Frequency: describes how often something occurs, either in definite or indefinite terms.

Example words: Always, once, seldom, rarely, usually.

Example sentences:

He often makes mistakes. (Indefinite)

I have told you twice. (Definite)

3. Adverb of Place: tells about where something happens or where something is.

Example words: Here, everywhere, near, down, away, backward, upward.

Example sentences:

There was somebody standing nearby.

Is that your scarf there?

4. Adverb of Manner: shows how or what way something happens or is done.

Example words: So, slowly, badly, beautifully, delightfully, loudly, anxiously.

Example sentences:

The soldiers fought bravely.

Is that so?

5. Adverb of Degree: shows how much, or in what degree or to what extent of qualities, properties, states, conditions and relations.

Example words: Almost, fully, rather, quite, too, enough, perfectly, lots.

Example sentences:

I am fully prepared.

I am rather busy.

6. Adverb of Affirmation and Negation: answers that something is true or some equivalent negative statement.

Example words: Certainly, surely, apparently, obviously, no, undoubtedly.

Example sentences:

Surely you are mistaken.

He is undoubtedly the best swimmer in the team.


Tips on using Adverbs:


Now that we have covered the basic knowledge about Adverbs, let us get few tips on usage of some specific adverbs in different types of sentences.


Tip #1: Else, Other, Otherwise:

Else:  should be followed by ‘but’. ‘Except ‘is used before object pronoun (him, her, them, us, me)

a)    It is nothing else than sheer madness. (Wrong)

b)    It is nothing else but sheer madness. (Correct)

c)    She has no one else to look after her but me. (Wrong)

d)    She has no one else to look after her except me. (Correct)

Other, Otherwise:  are followed by ‘than’.

a)    There is no way of reaching the island other than by boat.

b)    A partnership cannot be ended otherwise than by mutual agreement.


Tip #2: Never, Not, Nowhere:

Never:  is always placed after the verb BE or an auxiliary verb. For all other verbs, never is placed in front of the verb.

a)    They are never late.

b)    It never rains in January.

Not: Is a negative adverb but the use of ‘never’ in place of ‘not’ is incorrect.

a)    I never went to Delhi last year. (Wrong)

b)    I did not go to Delhi last year. (Correct)

Nowhere: is placed directly after the verb.

a)  This road goes nowhere.

b) Tom has nowhere to go.


Tip #3: Seldom or Never, Little or Nothing:

Seldom or Never/Seldom, If Ever: used to describe rarely, infrequently.

a)    The export quality tea is seldom or never used in the country.

b)    I have seldom, if ever been so embarrassed.

Little or Nothing/Little, If Anything: used to describe ‘hardly anything’.

a)    I can find little or nothing to fault in this book.

b)    There is little, if anything in the fridge to eat.


Tip #4: Very, Much:

Very: modifies the present particle and is used as an adverb or an adjective in positive degree.

a)    He is very tired after the journey.

b)    She is the very best teacher in our school. (Used in superlative degree)

Much: used with comparative degree and with past participles.

a)    A much loved member of the family.

b)    She is much wiser than her mother. (Before a comparative or superlative degree)


Tip #5: So, Too, Also:

So: should always be used with ‘that’.

  • She is so poor that she could not study further.

Too: should always be used with ‘to’.

  •  She is too poor to study further.

Too, As well, Also: used in the sense ‘besides’ or ‘in addition to’.

a)    She found her bag and money too/as well.

b)    She found her bag and also money. (Note: also is not used in end position)


Tip #6: Enough, Rather:

Enough: can be used as both an adjective and an adverb. As an adverb it is always placed after the adjective it modifies.

a)    He has enough money to spend. (Adjective)

b)    He was kind enough to help others with money. (Adverb)

Rather: is an adverb of degree. It can also be used before a noun with ‘a’ or ‘an’ placed before the noun.

a)    She is rather intelligent.

b)    It is rather a nuisance.

c)    I would rather have fruit juice. (Used as preference)


Tip #7: Often, Usually and Later:

Today, Since, Later: used to tell us when or for how long an action happened. They are placed at the end.

a)    I saw Sally today.

b)    I will call you later.

c)    I have not seen you since Monday.

Often, Usually, Rarely: express the frequency of an action. Placed before the main verb.

a)    I often eat vegetarian food.

b)    He rarely lies.

c)    He usually comes late.

d)    I am seldom late.


Tip #8: Inversion with Adverbs:

If an adverb is placed in front of a sentence, normal order of subject and verb is reversed, generally for emphasis.

After negative adverbial expressions:

Under no circumstances can we accept credit cards.

After 'seldom', 'rarely', 'never', and 'little':

a)    Seldom have I seen such a beautiful view.

b)    Rarely did he pay anyone a compliment.

c)    Never had I felt so happy.

d)    Little did he imagine how dangerous it would be?

After 'only' and 'not only':

a)    Only when the plane landed safely did he calm down.

b)    Not only was the car slow, it was also very uncomfortable.


Tip #9: Hardly, Scarcely:

Hardly, scarcely: adverbs of frequency meaning ‘almost not at all’

a)    She could scarcely keep her eyes open.

b)    I hardly know them.

They are often used to emphasise that one event quickly followed another.

c)  Hardly ever did she go on holiday. (She hardly ever went on holiday.)

d) Scarcely had she finished reading when she fell asleep. (She had scarcely finished reading when she fell asleep.)

e) Barely had they won the match when the coach had a heart attack. (They had barely won the match when the coach had a heart attack.)


Tip #10: As, Yes/No:

As: should be used to introduce predicative of the verbs like regard, describe, view, know, define, and treat.

a)    I regard him as my brother

b)    He treated him as his younger brother.

Exceptions: ‘as’ should be avoided to introduce predicative of the verbs like name, elect, think, consider, call, appoint, make, choose.

a)    He was elected president of the committee.

Yes/No: should be used according to the affirmative and negative answer to the question.

Have you taken food?

No, I have not taken food. (Yes, I have not taken food- Wrong)


Spot the Errors:


Can you spot the errors?

#1:

He plays tennis good. (Incorrect)

He plays tennis well. (Correct)

#2:

I am very much sorry. (Incorrect)

I am very sorry. (Correct)

#3:

She angrily spoke. (Incorrect)

She spoke angrily. (Correct)

#4:

The room is enough spacious for us. (Incorrect)

The room is spacious enough for us. (Correct)

#5:

I know them hardly. (Incorrect)

I hardly know them. (Correct)

#6:

The description was given vivid. (Incorrect)

The description was given vividly. (Correct)

#7:

The flower smells sweetly. (Incorrect)

The flower smells sweet. (Correct)

#8:

He was exceedingly paid for how skilful he handled the crowd. (Incorrect)

He was exceedingly paid for how skilfully he handled the crowd. (Correct)

#9:

They never are pessimistic. (Incorrect)

They are never pessimistic. (Correct)

#10:

She nowhere has to go. (Incorrect)

She has nowhere to go. (Correct)

#11:

He was enough patient to listen to every complaint. (Incorrect)

He was patient enough to listen to every complaint. (Correct)

#12:

He has been in hospital for last Tuesday. (Incorrect)

He has been in hospital since last Tuesday. (Correct)

#13:

She is too beautiful. (Incorrect)

She is very beautiful. (Correct)

#14:

They behaved cowardly. (Incorrect)

They behaved in a cowardly manner. (Correct)

#15:

Never have I seen such a mess. (Incorrect)

Never have I seen such a mess. (Correct)

#16:

I considered him as a friend. (Incorrect)

I considered him a friend. (Correct)

#17:

He plays tennis usually. (Incorrect)

He usually plays tennis. (Correct)

#18:

There is no way of finishing the work other by increasing team strength. (Incorrect)

There is no way of finishing the work other than by increasing team strength. (Correct)

#19:

She knows them scarcely. (Incorrect)

She hardly knows them. (Correct)

#20:

She baked the cake and as well ate. (Incorrect)

She baked the cake and ate it as well. (Correct)



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adverbs

Adverbs

Tips and Self-Assessment Quiz On Adverbs

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